CFS: Yale J for Humanities in Medicine

Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine welcomes submissions for publication from doctors, nurses, patients, family members, and others interested in the humanities and medicine. We welcome poetry, essays, and arts reviews with some flexibility in those categories. Please familiarize yourself with the journal and read the entirety of this page before submitting so that you can be sure to follow the stated requirements. If your submission is not in accordance with these guidelines, it will not be considered.
YJHM IS ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS MARCH 1 THROUGH MAY 1, 2013.
http://yjhm.yale.edu/submissions.htm

Costs of Health Care Essay Contest

COSTS OF CARE HEALTHCARE ESSAY CONTEST

http://www.costsofcare.org/advocacy/essay/

 

$4000 in prizes for the best stories from patients, doctors, and nurses illustrating the importance of cost-awareness in healthcare. Deadline November 15, 2012. Entries must be no longer than 750 words. Students are strongly encouraged to submit an anecdote. Entries will

be judged based on the quality of the writing and the relevance of the anecdote to the topic of cost-awareness in medicine. We are primarily seeking anecdotes. The focus if the contest is not to suggest policy solutions. Four care provider finalists and four patient finalists will be chosen. Care providers include doctors, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, clinical assistants, health administrators and students of these professions. Patients include patients as well as their friends or family members, and students of non-clinical professions including college students. All finalist entries will be read and rank-ordered according to the above criteria by our high-profile judges. Four $1,000 prizewinners will be named — two care providers and two patients.

 

Nobody’s Perfect

One of my favorite film scenes occurs at the end of Billy Wilder’s comedy Some Like It Hot

 http://youtu.be/2Inp_sWsUqQ 

“Nobody’s perfect.” I’m reminded of this famous scene by Kerry Ann Rockquemore’s essay in today’s Inside Higher Education, “The Costs of Perfectionism” –

http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/11/07/start-series-essays-about-dealing-academic-perfectionism

 “Ironically, while academic culture exacerbates perfectionist tendencies among many faculty members, perfectionism has been shown to have a negative impact on scholarly productivity. A recent study found that perfectionist professors have lower research productivity, fewer first-authored publications, and fewer citations than their peers. While it’s bad enough that perfectionism can make us feel perpetually miserable and tortured, the single greatest reason to overcome your perfectionism may be that it isn’t helpful to your scholarly productivity.”

CFS: Stories/Disability (Narrative Inquiry Bioethics)

Call for Stories for a Narrative Symposium: Living with the Label “Disability” | Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics—A Journal of Qualitative Research | Edited by Jeffery Bishop, MD, PhD and Naomi Sunderland, PhD

http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/symposia.html

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish an issue focused on stories from people living with impairment-highlighting their encounters with both medical practice and research. The word “disability” suggests a coherent group with a set of common characteristics. Yet, there exists a broad spectrum of impairments experienced by the group of people with “disabilities.” Attention to such differences is important and diverse accounts may aide a more open and honest dialogue between stakeholders, policy makers, healthcare workers, and academics. We would like your true, personal stories in a form that is interesting and easy to read.

In writing your story, you might want to think about:

  • How does the label “disability” interact with other aspects of your life in health care settings, for example your gender, culture, and geographical location?
  • How does the term “disability” reflect your actual embodied experiences of impairment?
  • When does the label “disability” not do justice to your particular experience of impairment?
  • Have you accepted the label “disability” in your life? If yes, what effects has this had for you and others e.g. family, friends, health care providers, and co-workers?
  • Describe the kind of experiences you might have that are possible because of your impairment.
  • How have labels of disability affected the degree to which you feel that your “authentic voice” has been heard by others e.g. family, friends, health care providers?
  • How has the impact of the label disability changed for you over time e.g. as you have aged or as societal expectations and standards have changed?
  • How has the label “disability” been a hindrance in your life? Has the label been beneficial?
  • What else might you want people to know?

You do not need to address all of these questions-write on the issues that you think are most important to share with others. You do not need to be a writer, just tell your story in your own words. We plan to publish 12 stories (800 – 2000 words) on this topic. Additional stories may be published as online-only supplemental material. We also publish two to four commentary articles that discuss the stories in the journal. If we receive more stories than we can publish in the journal then the 1000 Voices group will invite those authors to share their stories on the 1000 Voices website.

If you are interested in submitting a story, we ask you first to submit a 300-word proposal-a short description of the story you want to tell. Please include a statement about 1) what type of impairment you are living with and 2) what country you live in. Inquiries or proposals should be sent to the editorial office via email: narrativebioethics@gmail.com 

Preference given to story proposals received by October 31, 2012. For more information about the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, the guidelines for authors, and privacy policies, visit our webpage with Johns Hopkins University Press at:

http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/guidelines.html

Every issue of Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will be available electronically to over 1,000 institutional subscribers via ProjectMUSE.

CFS: Moral Distress Stories (Narrative Inquiry Bioethics)

Call for Stories: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics — Narrative Symposium: The Many Faces of Moral Distress Among Clinicians

Edited by Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, F.A.A.N. and Renee Boss, MD, MHS

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish an issue devoted to personal stories from clinicians regarding situations that cause moral distress and how they have responded to them. Moral distress arises when professionals find that they are unable to act in accordance with their moral convictions. The focus of this inquiry is on the personal and professional short- and long-term impact of moral distress and the ways that clinicians respond to and make meaning from that distress. Appropriate contributors might include nurses, physicians, social workers, nursing assistants, clinical ethicists, occupational and physical therapists, and professionals in training. We want true, personal stories in a form that is easy to read.

In writing your story, you might want to think about:

  •  Which specific clinical situations give rise to moral distress? Why?
  •  How do you experience moral distress—physically, psychologically, socially or spiritually?
  •  How do you deal with moral distress? In past distressing situations …
    •  Did you take actions that allowed you to uphold your deepest values?
    •  What conditions within yourself, the people involved, and the external environment allowed you to do this?
    •  How did you made sense of the situation?
  •  What have been the short or long term consequences?
    •  Have you ever been professionally disciplined for acting upon your moral conviction?
    •  How has moral distress affected your job performance or your commitment to your job?
    •  What has been left undone or been the residual impact?
    •  How have your own values evolved as a result of moral distress?
  •  How would you change the system (e.g., policies, hierarchies, processes) to alleviate moral distress within your position? Do you think it can be alleviated, or is it inevitable?

You do not need to address all of these questions—write on the issues that you think are most important to share with others. You do not need to be a writer, just tell your story in your own words. We plan to publish 12 stories (800 – 2000 words) on this topic. Additional stories may be published as online-only supplemental material. We also publish two to four commentary articles that discuss the stories in the journal.

If you are interested in submitting a story, we ask you first to submit a 300-word proposal—a short description of the story you want to tell. Please include a statement about what type of clinician you are and what kind of environment you work in (no institutional names are needed). Inquiries or proposals should be sent to the editorial office via email: narrativebioethics@gmail.com  We will give preference to story proposals received by Oct 31st. For more information about the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, the guidelines for authors, and privacy policies, visit our webpage with Johns Hopkins University Press at: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/guidelines.html

Theresa Brown: “The July Effect” (NY Times)

New York Times nurse-columnist Theresa Brown (a former professor of English!): “The July Effect brings into sharp relief a reality of hospital care: care is becoming more specialized, and nurses, who sometimes have years of experience, often know more than the greenest physicians. We know about medicating dying patients for pain, but we know a lot of other things, too: appropriate dosages for all kinds of drugs,… when transfusions and electrolyte replacements are needed, which lab tests to order and how to order them, whether consulting another specialist is a good idea, whether a patient needs to go to intensive care because his vital signs are worryingly unstable.”

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/dont-get-sick-in-july/

Nurse Valinoti/Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine

Recommended reading, Eileen Valinoti’s first-person narrative on the Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine:

After graduating from nursing school in 1954, I went back home until a hospital apartment became available. My mother bragged about my achievement to all the neighbors (my nursing expertise; my brilliant grades; my job offers overflowing in the mailbox). Our working class neighbors began to seek my advice on every imaginable affliction—arriving unannounced after dinner to show me their strange rashes, moles, warts and boils. I was amazed by their blind faith. Overnight it seemed my nursing degree had given me magical powers. Anxious to please, I did my best, keeping my answers as vague as possible.

Continue reading here . . .

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