How to Write a Successful NIH Grant Application

NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases offers an on-line guide to effective writing: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/researchfunding/grant/strategy/pages/3stratplan.aspx

Inside Higher Ed: Scholarly Publishing

Three articles in Inside Higher Ed today came to our attention.

The controversial proposed law originating in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, the Research Works Act, which would have prohibited the government from requiring open access publication of studies funded by the federal government, lost a key supporter, Elsevier Publishing and has been withdrawn by the bill’s co-sponsors. Steven Kolowich’s “A Significant Flinch” reports on the controversy and the fate of the bill, reminding readers that Elsevier’s support, crucial for the success of the bill, evaporated after a substantial global boycott of the mega-publisher.

Felicia LeClere’s essay “Grant Review Panels as Prom Committees,” despite its snarky title, extolls what she has observed while serving on grant review committees, suggesting that review panels work fairly more often than not.

And what about the anonymous reviewers of journal article manuscripts? Brian Rathbun’s “Dear Reviewers, a Word?” speaks to them, asking them to temper their rejections.

The Professor Is In

Karen L. Kelsky is The Professor of TheProfessorIsIn, a Web site that augments Kelsky’s consulting practice as an advisor to advanced doctoral students and junior faculty. She came to my attention through her essay in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “To: Professors; Re: Your Advisees,” in which she laments the lack of robust professional advising in graduate school.

Or to put it succinctly in Long’s Axiom: Graduate school prepares you . . . for graduate school.

The Web site offers a variety of suggestions on applying for academic jobs, writing, publishing, grant applications and related professional topics. It is now available through our “blinks” section.

Inside Higher Ed: Women Lag on NIH Renewal Rates

A brief item in today’s Inside Higher Ed:

There are relatively few differences in the success rates of women and men who apply for grants from the National Institutes of Health, according to a new study in Academic Medicine. But on grants after a first successful application, men are more likely than women to apply and to receive funding.

NINR Stats/2010

Recent federal budget cuts and proposed future cuts will have a cascading effect on what has already been a challenging season for nurse researchers. According to NINR’s stats for last year, few grant applications were approved. Word on the street is that all NIH funding mechanisms have pulled back for fear that three-year or five-year awards would not have the funds available to complete them.

Activity Code

Number of Applications Reviewed

Number of Applications Awarded

Success Rate3

Total Funding4

P01

3

0

0.0%

$0

R01

214

37

17.3%

$19,181,391

R03

33

3

9.1%

$266,738

R15

28

3

10.7%

$803,313

R21

161

15

9.3%

$3,229,076

Mechanism Total

439

58

13.2%

$23,480,518

F31

84

33

39.3%

$1,151,966

F32

1

1

100.0%

$54,854

K01

8

4

50.0%

$370,360

K23

9

5

55.6%

$604,660

K24

1

0

0.0%

$0

K99

8

4

50.0%

$320,232

R41

3

1

33.3%

$80,292

R42

1

0

0.0%

$0

R43

28

0

0.0%

$0

R44

10

3

30.0%

$748,425

T32

8

2

25.0%

$264,287

Mechanism Total

161

53

32.9%

$3,595,076

R24

0

0

0.0%

$114,000

Mechanism Total

0

0

0.0%

$114,000

NLN’s FREE Preparing GrantsWorkshop

Attend the NLN’s FREE Technical Assistance Workshop for Preparing Grants

Designed for both novice and experienced grant seekers, this workshop provides an update on the New Jersey Nursing Initiative, a special grant program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and programs administered by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing.

Techniques for writing successful proposals will be discussed and participants will gain a better understanding of grant-funded opportunities to support faculty development, strengthen program capacity, and enhance new technologies.

Trinitas School of Nursing, NLN Center of Excellence, 2008-2011, Elizabeth, New Jersey

April 26, 2010, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm (Funding provided by Laerdal Medical Corporation)

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES

  • Identify funding opportunities through the Division of Nursing.
  • Understand the grant writing process.
  • Describe guidelines for preparing federal grants.
  • Apply grant writing techniques to develop a grant.

Presenters:

  • E. Michele Richardson, MS, BSN, RN, Director, US Department of Health and Human Services, HRSA, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing
  • Aisha Mix, MPH, MSN, RN, CCM, Lieutenant Commander, US Public Health Services, Lead Consultant, Nursing Workforce Diversity Program, HRSA
  • Susan Bakewell-Sachs, PhD, RN, APRN, BC
  • Carol Kuser Loser Dean and Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, Health and Exercise Science, the College of New Jersey Program

This workshop is limited to 40 participants.

For more information and to register: http://www.nln.org/facultydevelopment/Workshops/grantwriting/index.htm  

The NLN offers continuing education credits for all its faculty development programs through IACET.

Writing Tip: Audience

In a continuing career advice series in Inside Higher Ed, Mary W. Walters reminds us:

In writing, it is easy to overlook the principles we are able to put to use so effectively in our daily lives. When we are developing a funding application — or working on a journal article or a textbook chapter for that matter — our audiences can seem invisible to us. We may become so involved in explaining what detailed convolutions brought us to our current research crossroads that we fail to take our prospective readers into consideration. What do they already know about this subject? What is it possible that they do not know? How can we make the information we are trying to convey more useful — and relevant, and interesting — to them?

As most of us know (from reading other people’s writing), scholars who ignore their readers are at risk of using language that no one outside their research niche can understand.

Walters is the author of Write an Effective Funding Application: A Guide for Researchers and Scholars (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009).

The article, “Know Your Audience,” is available on line in this open access publication.

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