CFP: Making Sense of: Dying and Death

10th Global Conference, Making Sense of:Dying and Death, Thursday 7th November 2013 – Saturday 9th November 2013, Athens, Greece, Call for Presentations

This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference explores dying and death and the ways culture impacts care for the dying, the overall experience of dying, and how the dead are remembered. Over the past four decades, scholarship in thanatology has increased dramatically. This particular conference seeks a broad array of perspectives that explore, analyze, and/or interpret the myriad interrelations and interactions that exist between death and culture. Culture not only presents and portrays ideas about “a good death” and norms that seek to achieve it, culture also operates as both a vehicle and medium through which meaning about death is communicated and understood. Sadly, too, culture sometimes facilitates death through violence.

Given the location of this year’s conference, a central theme in our proceedings (augmenting those listed below) will involve tracing the on-going and profound shift in contemporary attitudes toward death. In ancient Greece, for example, citizens learned about death and dying through intimate, hands-on experiences. Indeed, the same was true for most people throughout the world until the mid-20th century. Today, many people around the world maintain an increasingly passive role in caring for the dying, and supporting those who grieve a loss. Given that death, serving the dying, and caring for the bereaved has always been such an essential and unavoidable feature of life in traditional societies, a key emphasis in this year’s conference will involve an exploration of the connections between contemporary technologies, social media hubs, and modern health care delivery systems and the ways they impact current end-of-life issues and decisions, including the experience of bereavement and grief. This conference welcomes submissions that specifically assess how these factors are altering our contemporary attitudes toward death, and how patients, staff, and survivors intersect amidst newly emerging care settings and sites of memorialization.

We also welcome submissions that produce conversations engaging historical, ethnographic, normative, literary, anthropological, philosophical, artistic, political or other terms that elaborate a relationship between death and culture. Submissions in the form of papers, presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on any of the following additional core conference themes listed below:

1: Health Care Systems: Patients, Staff, and Institutions

  •  Modern Health Care Delivery Systems and Care for the Dying
  •  Palliative Care
  •  Hospice
  •  Elder Care/Ageing in Place Models
  •  Trauma and Emergency Care
  •  Nursing Homes/Skilled Facilities/Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFEs)/Assisted Living
  •  Clinical Competencies in Pain Management and Symptom Control
  •  Measurements, Incentives, Regulatory Statutes, and Recommendations
  •  Continuity of Care Across Treatment Settings
  •  Interdisciplinary Care

2: The Caregiver-Patient Relationship

  •  Caregiver’s (Physician’s?) Obligations and Virtues
  •  Medical Paternalism and Respect for the Patient, Autonomy
  •  Truth-Telling
  •  Informed Consent
  •  Medicine in the West for a Multicultural Society
  •  Contested Therapies Within the Physician-Patient Relationship
  •  Conflicts of Interest; Problems of Conscience
  •  Caregiver Stress/Caregiver Burnout/Compassion Fatigue
  •  Being With Someone Who Is Dying
  •  Assessment Challenges/Barriers

3: End-of-Life Issues and Decisions

  •  Defining Death
  •  Organ Transplantation and Organ Donation
  •  The Interplay of Ethical Meta-Principles at the End of Life
  •  Nonmaleficence
  •  Beneficence
  •  Autonomy
  •  Death Anxiety
  •  Choosing Death
  •  Advance Directives/Advance Planning/Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatments (POLST)/Do Not Resuscitate
  •  Considering End-of-Life Issues and Decisions and Legislation

4: Relationships Between Death and Culture:

  •  internet/social media
  •  music
  •  literature
  •  film
  •  broadcast media
  •  religious broadcasting
  •  journalism
  •  athletics
  •  comic books
  •  novels / poetry / short story
  •  television
  •  radio
  •  print media
  •  technology
  •  popular art / architecture
  •  sacred vs. profane space
  •  advertising
  •  consumerism

Papers, presentations and performances will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 14th June 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 13th September 2013. What to Send: 300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords E-mails should be entitled: DD10 Abstract Submission. Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs: Nate Hinerman: mailto:nphinerman@usfca.edu Rob Fisher: mailto:dd10@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume. For further details of the conference, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.Priory House, 149B Wroslyn Road, Freeland, Oxfordshire OX29 8HR, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)1993 882087 Fax: +44 (0)870 4601132

 

CFP: Western Schools Publishing

Western Schools is a publisher and nationally recognized accredited provider of peer-reviewed continuing nursing education home study courses. We are presently seeking authors and content editors to write articles and books for publication. Those contracted will receive financial compensation.

We have writing opportunities in the following nursing topics. Additional topics not listed may also be considered.

Topics: ADHD, Alzheimer’s Disease, ambulatory care, assessment, asthma, assessment, bioterrorism, cardiac, case management, chest tubes, CHF, competencies, critical care, death, depression, dialysis, diabetes, documentation and electronic health records, domestic violence, ECG monitoring, end of life, ethics, fall prevention, geriatrics, healing nutrition, hemodynamic monitoring, hepatitis, HIV, holistic health, infections, immunizations, informatics, leadership, legal issues, maternal-newborn, medical errors, medical-surgical topics, mentoring, MRSA, neonatal, neuro, nursing management, nursing practice, OB/GYN, oncology, orthopedics, pain management, palliative care, pediatrics, pediatric pharmacology, pharmacology, preceptorship, professional nursing topics, psychopharmacology, rehab, renal, respiratory topics, safety, school nursing, sedation/analgesia, seizures, sleep apnea, social media, stroke, TB, trauma, weight loss surgery, and women’s health.

Requirements: Authors should have a valid nursing license and prior publishing experience. An advanced degree in nursing and five years of clinical and/or academic experience in the content area being developed is preferred. Experienced authors with degrees in fields other than nursing will also be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Interested candidates should e-mail their CV and a writing sample, along with their contact information to: authors@westernschools.com  Please specify topic(s) of interest. Additionally, if you know of someone else who may be interested, please feel free to forward this e-mail to them.

Amy Bernard, MS, BSN, RN-BC, Director, Continuing Education, Western Schools, 400 Manley Street, PO Box 65, West Bridgewater, MA 02379, Phone (508) 638-7060, Fax: 508-894-0179, Website: www.westernschools.com

CFP: Making Sense of Dying & Death

9th Global Conference : Making Sense Of: Dying and Death | Saturday 10th November – Monday 12th November 2012 | Salzburg, Austria

Call For Papers: This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference explores dying and death and the ways culture impacts care for the dying, the overall experience of dying, and ways the dead are remembered. Over the past three decades, scholarship in thanatology has increased dramatically. This particular conference seeks a broad array of perspectives that explore, analyze, and/or interpret the myriad interrelations and interactions that exist between death and culture. Culture not only presents and portrays ideas about “a good death” and norms that seek to achieve it, culture also operates as both a vehicle and medium through which meaning about death is communicated and understood. Sadly, too, culture sometimes facilitates death through violence. A key emphasis in this year’s conference will be an exploration of the connections between health care systems, caregivers, and matters of public policy that serve those at the end-of-life. This conference specifically aims to assess how heath care systems, patients, and staff intersect during end-of-life care, and explores how important the caregiver-patient relationship continues to be amidst end-of-life issues and decisions.

We also welcome submissions that produce conversations engaging historical, ethnographic, normative, literary, anthropological, philosophical, artistic, political or other terms that elaborate a relationship between death and culture. Papers, reports, presentations, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues on or broadly related to any of the following themes:

  • 1: Health Care Systems: Patients, Staff, and Institutions
    • * Modern Health Care Delivery Systems and Care for the Dying
    • * Palliative Care
    • * Hospice
    • * Elder Care/Ageing in Place Models
    • * Trauma and Emergency Care
    • * Nursing Homes/Skilled Facilities/Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFEs)/Assisted Living
    • * Clinical Competencies in Pain Management and Symptom Control
    • * Measurements, Incentives, Regulatory Statutes, and Recommendations
    • * Continuity of Care Across Treatment Settings
    • * Interdisciplinary Care
  • 2: The Caregiver-Patient Relationship
    • * Provider’s/Caregiver’s Obligations and Virtues
    • * Medical Paternalism and Respect for the Patient, Autonomy
    • * Truth-Telling
    • * Informed Consent
    • * Medicine in the West for a Multicultural Society
    • * Contested Therapies Within the Physician-Patient Relationship
    • * Conflicts of Interest; Problems of Conscience
    • * Caregiver Stress/Caregiver Burnout/Compassion Fatigue
    • * Being With Someone Who Is Dying
    • * Assessment Challenges/Barriers
  • 3: End-of-Life Issues and Decisions
    • * Defining Death
    • * Organ Transplantation and Organ Donation
    • * The Interplay of Ethical Meta-Principles at the End of Life
    • * Nonmaleficence
    • * Beneficence
    • * Autonomy
    • * Death Anxiety
    • * Choosing Death
    • * Advance Directives/Advance Planning/Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatments (POLST)/Do Not Resuscitate
    • * Considering End-of-Life Issues and Decisions and Legislation
  • 4: Relationships Between Death and Culture:
    • * music
    • * literature
    • * film
    • * broadcast media
    • * religious broadcasting
    • * journalism
    • * athletics
    • * comic books
    • * novels / poetry / short story
    • * television
    • * radio
    • * print media
    • * internet / technology
    • * popular art / architecture
    • * sacred vs. profane space
    • * advertising
    • * consumerism

Papers will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th May 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 3rd August 2012. 300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords. E-mails should be entitled: Care, Dying and the End of Life Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline).Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs Nate Hinerman, Nursing/Theology and Religious Studies, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, USA E-mail: nphinerman@usfca.edu  | Rob Fisher, Network Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net, Freeland, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom E-Mail: dd9@inter-disciplinary.net 

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume. For further details of the project, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/

For further details of the conference, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

CFS: Death Studies

Death Studies | Published By: Routledge | Frequency: 10 issues per year | 2008 Impact Factor: .842

Ranking: 52/101 Psychology, Multidisciplinary, 13/32 in Social issues, and 22/29 in Social Sciences, Biomedical

Now published ten times each year, this acclaimed journal provides refereed papers on significant research, scholarship, and practical approaches in the fast growing areas of bereavement and loss, grief therapy, death attitudes, suicide, and death education. It provides an international interdisciplinary forum in which a variety of professionals share results of research and practice, with the aim of better understanding the human encounter with death and assisting those who work with the dying and their families. Peer Review Policy: All articles have undergone anonymous double-blind review by at least two referees.

http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/07481187.asp

CFP: Making Sense of: Dying and Death

Call for Papers: 8th Global Conference, Making Sense of: Dying and Death (Saturday 12th November – Monday 14th November 2011, Hotel Angelo, Prague, Czech Republic)

Submissions might be imagined in any (or none) of the following ways: death as an expression of doctrinal beliefs and/or core values, death and dying as an on-going movement between an individual or community and a larger socio-cultural matrix, or death as essentially a cultural construction. Investigations that engage cultural studies from a variety of perspective are certainly encouraged. We also welcome perspectives that interrogate the stability of meaning(s) assigned to such terms (“culture,” “death,” “dignity,” “care,” etc.) and their complex inter-relations. Specifically, submissions should be framed with at least one of the following four rubrics in mind: death/dying within culture, culture within death/dying, death/dying as popular culture (and vice versa), or death/dying in tension with culture. We welcome submissions that produce conversations engaging historical, ethnographic, normative, literary, anthropological, philosophical, artistic, political or other terms that elaborate a relationship between death and culture. For example, submissions might investigate death and dying in relation to any of the following realms of culture:

  • music
  • literature
  • film
  • broadcast media
  • religious broadcasting
  • journalism
  • athletics
  • comic books
  • novels / poetry / short story
  • television
  • radio
  • print media
  • internet / technology
  • popular art / architecture
  • sacred vs. profane space
  • advertising
  • consumerism
  • new religious movements/religious subcultures

Papers will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 17th June 2011. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 23rd September 2011. 300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract. E-mails should be entitled: Dying and Death Abstract Submission

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs

Nate Hinerman, Nursing/Theology and Religious Studies, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, USA, E-mail: nphinerman@usfca.edu

Rob Fisher, Network Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net, Freeland, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, E-Mail: dd8@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belongs to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

For further details about the project please visit http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/

For further details about the conference please visit http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/call-for-papers/

CFS: Aging and End of Life (Am J Intellectual Developmental Disabilities)

Call for submissions for a special issue of the American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Aging and End of Life. The purpose of this special issue is to present a collection of papers that bring new insight from a variety of perspectives and disciplines to the ways in which older adults with IDD can experience fulfilling lives and age successfully. Deadline for submissions is September 1, 2011. Please contact Guest Editors Elizabeth Perkins (eperkins@mail.usf.edu) or Sandra Friedman (friedman.sandra@tchden.org) for more information.

CFS: End-of-Life Care

Call for Submissions on End-of-Life Care for the Spring Issue of Hektoen International-A Journal of the Medical Humanities

Hektoen International is now accepting short article, poetry, and artwork submissions for its Spring 2011 issue on end-of-life care. You are invited to submit work that explores topics ranging from (but not limited to):

  • Historical and philosophical perspectives on death and dying
  • Coping with grief and loss
  • The use of the arts in palliative care
  • The personal experiences of patients, healthcare workers, families, and caregivers
  • Ethical and spiritual approaches to care for the dying
  • Perspectives on death from various cultural and faith traditions

Please submit your work to Rachel Baker, Managing editor at: journal@hektoeninternational.org by March 15, 2011.

Submission instructions Please include with your submission:

  • Title of submission with word count
  • Author(s) names, title and professional affiliation
  • A 75-150 word biography
  • The reference style you are using
  • Articles should be less than 2,000 words.

Up to four contributions of poetry per issue. Include a poet statement (< 200 words).

Up to four contributions of art. Include captions (title, medium, size) and an artist statement (< 200 words). Be sure to spell check in American English prior to submission.

One manuscript only per submission deadline. File format/name: Articles should be submitted in Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format.

Images should be sent as a JPEG or GIF file. Please include captions in a separate Word document.

For complete details visit “Submission instructions” on the Hektoen site:  http://www.hektoeninternational.org  

Hektoen International is published online in quarterly installments by the Hektoen Institute of Medicine, a non-for-profit organization promoting medical research and education. The journal is named in honor of Dr. Ludvig Hektoen, a distinguished professor of pathology at the University of Chicago.

CFP: Making Sense Of: Dying and Death: Care, Dying and the End of Life

7th Global Conference, Making Sense Of: Dying and Death: Care, Dying and the End of Life, Monday 8th November – Wednesday 10th November 2010, Prague, Czech Republic

This inter- and multi-disciplinary conference explores connections between health care systems, caregivers, and matters of public policy that serve those at the end-of-life. As the primary cause of death increasingly becomes slow progressive illnesses, many people are now living longer. As a result, end-of-life care has been pushed from the context of the home to the context of the hospital so that the dying can be close to important life-extending technologies. In turn, this means care giving at the end-of-life is often assigned to medical professionals rather than friends and family. The impact of this migration has caused many to have an increasingly passive role in caring for the dying. A challenge has arisen surrounding how to explore questions of meaning, questions of value, and questions of relationship with the dying when the context of care they receive is almost purely geared towards the biological dimension of their personhood. Furthermore, our increasingly passive role in providing care to the dying leaves, for many, few opportunities to reflect on and consider carefully one’s own mortality. A common perception is emerging that portrays death as a “medical failure,” and not as a natural process.

As clinical competencies surrounding pain management and symptom control evolve, the formation of interdisciplinary teams designed to treat the whole person has become increasingly necessary. Advance planning is a vital way to assist efforts to insure the dying receive the kind(s) of care they desire. However, discontinuity of care across treatment settings can undermine even the clearest planning documents.

Ethical ideals, patient goals, and regulatory requirements of a given institution all shape the dying trajectory. This conference specifically aims to assess how heath care systems, patients, and staff intersect during end-of-life care, and explores how important the caregiver-patient relationship continues to be amidst end-of-life issues and decisions.

Papers, reports, presentations, workshops and pre-formed panels are invited on issues on or broadly related to any of the following themes:

1: Health Care Systems: Patients, Staff, and Institutions

  • * Modern Health Care Delivery Systems and Care for the Dying
  • * Palliative Care
  • * Hospice
  • * Elder Care/Ageing in Place Models
  • * Trauma and Emergency Care
  • * Nursing Homes/Skilled Facilities/Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFEs)/Assisted Living
  • * Clinical Competencies in Pain Management and Symptom Control
  • * Measurements, Incentives, Regulatory Statutes, and Recommendations
  • * Continuity of Care Across Treatment Settings
  • * Interdisciplinary Care

2: The Caregiver-Patient Relationship

  • * Caregiver’s (Physician’s?) Obligations and Virtues
  • * Medical Paternalism and Respect for the Patient, Autonomy
  • * Truth-Telling
  • * Informed Consent
  • * Medicine in the West for a Multicultural Society
  • * Contested Therapies Within the Physician-Patient Relationship
  • * Conflicts of Interest; Problems of Conscience
  • * Caregiver Stress/Caregiver Burnout/Compassion Fatigue
  • * Being With Someone Who Is Dying
  • * Assessment Challenges/Barriers

3: Death Systems: Matters of Public Policy

  • * Defining Death
  • * Organ Transplantation and Organ Donation
  • * Death Certification
  • * The Coroner and the Medical Examiner
  • * Autopsies
  • * The Impact of the Death System

4: End-of-Life Issues and Decisions

  • * The Interplay of Ethical Meta-Principles at the End of Life
  • * Nonmaleficence
  • * Beneficence
  • * Autonomy
  • * Justice
  • * Fidelity
  • * Death Anxiety
  • * Choosing Death
  • * Advance Directives/Advance Planning/Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatments (POLST)/Do Not Resuscitate
  • * Wills and Inheritance
  • * Probate
  • * Insurance and Death Benefits
  • * Considering End-of-Life Issues and Decisions and Legislation

Papers will be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 28th May 2010. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 24th September 2010. 300 word abstracts should be submitted to the Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats, following this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract. E-mails should be entitled: Care, Dying and the End of Life Abstract Submission. Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:

Nate Hinerman, Nursing/Theology and Religious Studies, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, USA, E-mail: nphinerman@usfca.edu and Rob Fisher, Network Leader, Inter-Disciplinary.Net, Freeland, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, E-Mail: dd7@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: series of research projects, which in turn belong to the Probing the Boundaries programmes of Inter-Disciplinary.Net. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore discussions which are innovative and challenging. All papers accepted for and presented at this conference are eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be invited to go forward for development into a themed ISBN hard copy volume.

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

For further details about the project please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/

For further details about the conference please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/dying-and-death/call-for-papers/

CFS: Health, Culture, Body International Conference

Call for abstracts: An International and interdisciplinary conference on Health, Culture and the Human Body

Epidemiology, ethics and history of medicine, perspectives from Central Europe and Turkey

Mainz, Germany, 17-19 September 2010

The face of medicine is rapidly evolving: New developments in medicine, preventive and therapeutic interventions are raising novel ethical questions in societies undergoing fast demographic change at home while participating in global interactions through travel and migration. Throughout history, the perception of health and illness and the ethical assessment of medical practices have often been different between diverse value-cultures. This may affect the responses to well-established themes in medicine, such as the control of infectious diseases, attitudes towards a person’s death, or culturally specific approaches to dealing with the integrity of the human body. Consequently, these ethical considerations have given rise to complex ethical debates resulting in different legal regulations of these developments in different countries.

The international conference “Health, Culture and the Human Body” will focus on selected cases from Turkey, Germany, and other countries. These countries have been closely connected by substantial migration processes for some fifty years. Historically, these countries were linked by medical sciences and clinical practice. These interactions will be analysed jointly from historical, epidemiological, and ethical perspectives, paving the way for the implementation of an interdisciplinary “medicine studies” approach in the field of intercultural and migration medicine.

(See also: www.springer.com/philosophy/philosophy+of+sciences/journal/12376 )

The chosen thematic areas are:

§ infectious diseases (e.g., plague, leprosy, cholera, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS)

§ the end of life (e.g., patient autonomy vs. family autonomy, advance directives, active and passive euthanasia, palliative care)

§ dealing with the human body (e.g., anatomical research, organ donation, biomaterial in international studies)

§ migration and medicine

Abstracts (max. 250 words) of proposed conference papers need to be submitted by 31 January 2010,

to the attention of Ilhan Ilkilic MD PhD, E-Mail: ilkilic@uni-mainz.de  (Institute for History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany)

Phone +49-(0)-6131-39-37343, Fax +49-(0)-6131-39-36682

Publication of selected papers is envisaged.

Venue: Mainz Academy of Letters and Sciences, Mainz, Germany

Organising institutions:

* JohannesGutenberg University Mainz Medical Centre (Germany)

* IstanbulUniversity (Turkey)

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