CFS: Sexual Health, Asia/Africa/Latin America (Culture, Health Sexuality)

The Royal Tropical Institute and the international peer reviewed journal Culture, Health & Sexuality invite authors to submit contributions to a special themed issue of the international journal Culture, Health & Sexuality which will focus on sexual and reproductive health issues among indigenous and minority ethnic peoples in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Topics of special interest include:

  • Gender, tradition and modernity. Indigenous groups may have particular ideas and practices related to gender and reproductive health of which governments and development agencies are unaware, but influence reproductive and sexual health choices such as birthing practices and sexual partnerships.
  • Territory, mobility and access to sexual and reproductive health services. Migration from and into indigenous and minority peoples territories has resulted in shifting demographics with associated social transformations. Globally many indigenous and minority ethnic groups are highly mobile and/or nomadic. Health systems face difficulties to respond to the needs of migrants and mobile people in general, even if they belong to dominant ethnic groups. Moreover in and out-migration can be shown to have specific impacts on sexual behaviour, and in many cases heighten the vulnerability of indigenous and minority peoples both those who are mobile and those who remain behind.
  • Agency. Rather than conceptualizing indigenous and minority peoples as passive, the ability of minorities (and majority groups) to act and exert power, to both respond to and initiate change, will be recognized.
  • Transforming monocultural health systems. Most state health systems promote monocultural health systems based exclusively on Western medicine, or assume that medicine is a culturally neutral, objective, scientific profession. Some countries such as India and Vietnam recognized and promote non-western traditional medicines of the dominant cultural group but not those of minority and indigenous groups. Do multicultural or intercultural health systems improve sexual and reproductive health and who should monitor and evaluate positive or negative health effects and how?

All papers included in special issues are reviewed in the normal way and only those that are recommended for publication by peer review will be accepted. The guest editors of this special issue will be Pauline Oosterhoff, Chris Lyttleton and Anke van der Kwaak. Potential contributors are encouraged to submit a draft paper, prepared to the journal’s format (please see http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1369-1058&linktype=44 ) in advance to Pauline Oosterhoff P.Oosterhoff@kit.nl  and Chris Lyttleton and Anke van der Kwaak by 1 October 2012 for pre-review. Potential contributors are strongly advised to read the journal and the author guidelines before preparing a paper. Guidelines on the preparation of papers for publication in Culture, Health and Sexuality are available at: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/tf/13691058.html . Final papers must not exceed 7,500 words in total (including all references and notes) and should be submitted by 1 November 2012. Final papers should be submitted formally via the journal’s website http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tchs  Please indicate clearly in your on-line final submission that this is a contribution to the special themed issue on sexual and reproductive health issues among indigenous and minority ethnic peoples in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: