CFP: Aging and Age Studies: Foundations and Formations

Call for Papers: N.A.N.A.S. North American Network in Aging Studies Conference

Aging and Age Studies: Foundations and Formations, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, May 19-22, 2015

The North American Network in Aging Studies (NANAS) was established in 2013 to bring together scholars and researchers from across a variety of disciplines—humanities, arts, gerontology, anthropology, sociology, health care, and others—interested in critical examinations of how age is conceptualized, defined, experienced, performed, and critiqued. At this inaugural research conference, we seek to build on the foundations and define new formations in this vital and growing field of inquiry.

We invite scholarship and research that provides fresh insights into the changing manifestations and interpretations of age through engagement with cultural texts (e.g., literature, history, media, public policy, adaptive technology), as well as qualitative or other meaning-based approaches. Presentations might investigate local and global implications of age and aging; consider how diverse approaches to studying age can enable richer understanding in traditional academic disciplines; develop new, cross-disciplinary methodologies that expose the often-unacknowledged effects of age relations and age assumptions; and/or examine ethical, political, philosophical, or practical questions about what it means to be humans living through time. Additional topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Intergenerational relations: philosophical, historical, literary and/or gerontological insights
  • Problematizing age: other ways to organize human life
  • Memory and forgetting as personal and cultural phenomena
  • Age narratives
  • Creativity and imagination as a site of knowledge in old age
  • Age and the environment; the meaning of space and place
  • Hegemony of biological and non-biological models of aging
  • Morality, spirituality and ethics as mediated by age
  • Age across cultural, regional, or historical differences
  • Gerontology meets age studies: crossroads of science and meaning
  • Age and the body
  • Age across cultural, regional, or historical differences
  • Gerontological literacy and illiteracy
  • Beyond the young/old binary
  • Disciplinary challenges in an interdisciplinary field
  • Age and personal objects
  • Age, technology, and new media
  • Illustrating, dramatizing, choreographing, composing, and/or performing age
  • Defining age through public policy
  • Age across cultural, regional, or historical differences
  • Geography, politics, economics, and the lived experience of aging
  • Age in the classroom
  • Age and sexuality
  • Age and identity
  • Age-based roles in celebrations, ceremonies, and/or other public events.
  • Age and dis/ability
  • Imagining age
  • Age, nation, development: postcolonial paradigms

Proposal abstracts for individual papers and themed sessions/symposia are welcome. Each person may participate in a maximum of two sessions.

Proposal abstracts for individual papers should include the title of the paper, an abstract of 250 words, and contact details.

Proposal abstracts for themed sessions/symposia of up to 4 presentations should include the title, an 800-word abstract that refers to each paper, and contact details of the chair(s) and contributors. Researchers and scholars in all stages of their careers are welcome to submit proposals.

Proposals will be accepted until December 1, 2014. Please send abstracts to: demedekb@miamiOH.edu.

If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact demedekb@miamiOH.edu. Additional conference details can be found at:

www.agingstudies.org.

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