Month: January 2015

Inside Higher Ed: Welcome criticism (Rockquemore)

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, writing for Inside Higher Ed, advises early-career researchers and scholars to welcome criticism rather than to become frustrated or dispirited by it. It's all about context, including the context of your reaction, as well as seeking out the advice of trusted colleagues: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/01/28/essay-how-those-starting-academic-careers-should-respond-criticism

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Jason Priem presents Altmetrics at Purdue University, February 14, 2012

This presentation featured Jason Priem from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill discussing the future of scientific communication. Jason is with the school of information and library science and his talk was entitled: Toward a Second Revolution: altmetrics, total-impact, and the Decoupled Journal. For a complete set of slides from this presentation go … Continue reading Jason Priem presents Altmetrics at Purdue University, February 14, 2012

Chronicle: Really Obvious but Ignored Guide to Getting Published

Kirsten Bell, writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education's Vitae, offers sage advice to authors seeking publication: Know the journal to which you want to submit. (Hint: Actually read articles from several of the most recent issues and read the author guidelines usually found on the journal's web site.) Nominate reviewers if given the option. … Continue reading Chronicle: Really Obvious but Ignored Guide to Getting Published

CFP: History of Nursing & Health Care History Conference

Call for Abstracts: Thirty-second Annual History of Nursing & Health Care History Conference Dublin, Ireland, September 17-20, 2015 Please Note: The AAHN Board of Directors approved waiving the membership requirement to present at the 2015 Conference in an effort to promote submission of papers to this international conference. The waiver applies to the 2015 Conference … Continue reading CFP: History of Nursing & Health Care History Conference

How to Correct the Media When They Misreport Your Research

A study published in BMJ 2014;349 reports that mass-media misrepresentations and inaccuracies concerning research findings are often the products of university communication offices' self-promotion efforts, the result of increasing competition among high education institutions to claim points of pride. According to this study's abstract: Results 40% (95% confidence interval 33% to 46%) of the press releases contained … Continue reading How to Correct the Media When They Misreport Your Research