Bookmark This: Evaluating Journal Quality

The proliferation of online open-access journals has added new complexity to the already difficult task of identifying and submitting manuscripts to journals (especially in fields where a peer-reviewed journal article is the gold standard).

This web site, prepared by Carolyn Mills (UConn Libraries), is very helpful: http://guides.lib.uconn.edu/journaleval/gettingstarted

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CFS: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (PHP) advances pedagogy through contributions in areas such as curriculum and course/program design, assessment, and administration relevant to teaching and learning. The content of the journal is especially relevant to instructors or trainers who provide continuing professional education in the broad arena of health promotion and disease prevention. The quarterly journal welcomes works addressing the art and science of teaching and learning, and how it contributes to the formation and ongoing development of the health promotion professional working in any site and with a range of populations.

View the Manuscript Submission Guidelines >>

Study of Predatory Open Access Nursing Journals

Oermann et al. (2016) report on a systematic study of predatory open-access nursing journals:

“There were 140 predatory nursing journals from 75 publishers. Most journals were new, having been inaugurated in the past 1 to 2 years. One important finding was that many journals only published one or two volumes and then either ceased publishing or published fewer issues and articles after the first volume. Journal content varied widely, and some journals published content from dentistry and medicine, as well as nursing. Qualitative findings from the surveys confirmed previously published anecdotal evidence, including authors selecting journals based on spam emails and inability to halt publication of a manuscript, despite authors’ requests to do so. . . . Predatory journals exist in nursing and bring with them many of the “red flags” that have been noted in the literature, including lack of transparency about editorial processes and misleading information promoted on websites. The number of journals is high enough to warrant concern in the discipline about erosion of our scholarly literature.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27706886

Listen to Reviewers!

A fine editorial by Dr. Karen Morin, RN, FAAN, has some good advice for nurse authors: Pay attention to reviewers!

Morin describes reviewers’ pet peeves (lack of conceptual congruency, poorly written manuscripts, limited reviews of the literature) and provides suggestions (offer something new and important, get peer review of drafts prior to submission, follow instructions and proofread).

https://www.healio.com/nursing/journals/jne/2017-2-56-2/%7Bd96af37a-aef2-48cd-8dcf-ef5d40db406c%7D/what-reviewers-say-authors-listen-up