CFP: Women’ s Health

Women’s Health: Call for Papers

Women’s Health focuses on the most important advances and highlights their relevance in the clinical setting. The presentation of Women’s Health has been optimized to deliver essential concise information in an easily assimilable formats -vital for an increasingly time-constrained community. The audience for Women’s Health consists of clinicians, research scientists, decision-makers and a range of professionals in the healthcare community

Why publish with Women’s Health?

  • Global free access to your article, increasing the visibility and reach of your paper
  • Rigorous peer review of your research
  • Indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed
  • Retention of copyright under a Creative Commons license

CFP: Reducing Induction, C-section (JOGNN)

The Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing (JOGNN) is soliciting systematic reviews on interdisciplinary strategies to reduce elective induction of labor, to reduce cesarean deliveries among nulliparous women with single, head down fetuses at 37 weeks or more gestation, or to increase vaginal birth after cesarean delivery.

JOGNN is a premier resource for health care professionals committed to clinical scholarship that advances the health care of women and newborns. With a focus on nursing practice, JOGNN addresses the latest research, practice issues, policies, opinions, and trends in the care of women, childbearing families, and newborns.

Submit here:

Journal info here:

CFP: Advances in Nursing Science

Given recent history of international conflict and violence, the health and well-being of those who have served the military of any country world-wide has become a major challenge that influences the well-being of families, communities and nations. This issue of ANS includes four articles that address the health of veterans and their families, and a guest editorial that provides information about the U.S. military research programs that are addressing these significant challenges. In addition, this issue includes a number of “General Topic” articles that extend the discourse in a number of areas of important nursing scholarship. Each article in this issue will be featured on the ANS blog, so I invite you to visit and follow the blog to stay informed about the latest in ANS! Visit our ANS Blog to share your comments.
Peggy L. Chinn, RN, PhD, FAAN
Professor Emerita, University of Connecticut
Editor, Advances in Nursing Science
The primary purposes of Advances in Nursing Science (ANS) are to advance the development of nursing knowledge and to promote the integration of nursing philosophies, theories and research with practice. While the journal provides scholarly articles that have relevance for all health-related disciplines, we are particularly committed to claiming nursing’s rightful place in the development of health knowledge. We expect high scholarly merit and encourage innovative, cutting edge ideas that challenge prior assumptions and that present new, intellectually challenging perspectives. We seek works that speak to global sustainability and that take an intersectional approach, recognizing class, color, sexual and gender identity, and other dimensions of human experience related to health. Manuscripts can be based on any methodology, including scholarly inquiry/research, philosophic and theoretic analysis/synthesis, integrative reviews, and original exploration of diverse approaches to creating nursing knowledge. All submissions must include a statement that addresses the significance of the work for the evolution of the discipline of nursing.
Our future issue topics manuscript submission timelines:
39:4 – Palliative Care
Manuscript Due Date – April 15, 2016
40:1 – ANS Retrospective – March 2017
Manuscript Due Date – July 15, 2016
40:2 – Toxic Stress- December 2016
Manuscript Due Date – October 15, 2016
Always available!
ANS General Topic
Submissions open any time

CFS: Brokenness, Healing Journey

The Journal of Humanities in Rehabilitation is proud to announce the publication of our Summer 2015 issue. In this edition we explore the multifaceted nature of brokenness  in our journey towards healing. Together, the contributors in this issue masterfully communicate the importance of recognizing that in our roles as clinicians and educators, patients and students, seeking wholeness means sharing our brokenness and our humanness together in common dialogue.
JHR is a peer-reviewed, multi-media journal using a collaborative model with rehabilitation professionals, patients and their families to gain a greater understanding of the human experience of disability through art, literature and narrative. The purpose of this interdisciplinary journal is to raise the consciousness and deepen the intellect of the humanistic relationship in the rehabilitation sciences. JHR has an open access publishing model, with no fees associated with subscriptions or submissions. You can access the journal by following the links in this email or by going to

CFS: Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health

Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health (International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics)

Although by no means mainstream, phenomenological approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine are no longer novel. Such approaches take the lived body – as opposed the body understood as a material, biological object – as a point of departure. Such approaches are also invested in a detailed examination and articulation of a plurality of diverse subjective experiences, as opposed to reifying experience under the rubric of “the subject” or “the patient.” Phenomenological approaches to bioethics and medicine have broached topics such as pain, trauma, illness, death, and bodily alienation – to name just a few – and our understandings of these topics have benefitted from and are deepened by being analyzed using the tools of phenomenology.
There is also a rich history of approaching phenomenology from a feminist perspective. Combining these two approaches and methodologies has furthered our understandings of lived experiences of marginalization, invisibility, nonnormativity, and oppression. Approaching phenomenology from a feminist perspective has also broadened the subject matter of traditional phenomenology to include analyses of sexuality, sexual difference, pregnancy, and birth. Moreover, feminist phenomenological accounts of embodiment have also helped to broaden more traditional philosophical understandings and discussions of what singular bodies are and of how they navigate the world as differently sexed, gendered, racialized, aged, weighted, and abled. Feminist phenomenological accounts and analyses have helped to draw to the fore the complicated ways in which identities intersect and have made the case that if we are really to understand first person embodied accounts of experience, then a traditional phenomenological account of “the subject” simply does not suffice.
The aim of this International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics special issue (11.1) is to explore and develop the connections between feminist phenomenology, philosophy of medicine, bioethics, and health. The issue will consider on the one hand, how feminist phenomenology can enhance and deepen our understanding of issues within medicine, bioethics, and health, and on the other hand, whether and how feminist approaches to medicine, bioethics, and health can help to advance the phenomenological project.
Topics appropriate to the special issue include, but are not limited to, feminist phenomenological analyses and/or critiques of:
  •  Health, illness, and healthcare
  • Social determinants of health (e.g., food justice, environmental justice, labor equity, transnational inequities)
  • Negotiating medical bureaucracies and access to care
  • Health/care in constrained circumstances (i.e., in prisons, as migrants, in conditions without secure health insurance)
  • Sex and gender
  • Rape, sexual violence, or domestic violence
  • Transgender and trans* experiences of embodiment, health, or healthcare
  • Intersex experiences of embodiment, health, or healthcare
  • Death and dying
  • Palliative care and end of life
  • Caregiving for ill friends, family members, and children
  • Pregnancy, labor, childbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Abortion, contraception, sterilization
  • Organ transplantation
  • Cosmetic surgery
  • Body weight
  • Addiction
  • Mental illness
  • Physical and cognitive disability
 Submission Information: Word limit for essays: 8000 words. IJFAB also welcomes submissions in these additional categories:
  •  Conversations provide a forum for public dialogue on particular issues in bioethics. Scholars engaged in fruitful exchanges are encouraged to share those discussions here. Submissions for this section are usually 3,000–5,000 words.
  • Commentaries offer an opportunity for short analyses (under 4,000 words) of specific policy issues, legislation, court decisions, or other contemporary developments within bioethics.
  • Narratives often illuminate clinical practice or ethical thinking. IJFAB invites narratives that shed light on aspects of health, health care, or bioethics. Submissions for the section are usually in the range of 3,000–5,000 words.
 Deadline for submissions: February 1, 2017
Anonymous review: All submissions are subject to triple anonymous peer review. The Editorial Office aims to return an initial decision to authors within eight weeks. Authors are frequently asked to revise and resubmit based on extensive reviewer comments. The Editorial Office aims to return a decision on revised papers within four-six weeks.
Submissions should be emailed indicating special issue “Feminist Phenomenology and Medicine” in the subject heading.
All submissions should conform to IJFAB style guidelines. For further details, please check the IJFAB website.
For further information regarding the special issue please email the Guest Editor Lauren Freeman at the Department of Philosophy University of Louisville.

CFS: Patient-Centered Care, Mental Health Svcs

Special issue of Issues in Mental Health Nursing on the topic of PATIENT-CENTERED CARE: A FOCUS IN PROVISION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Manuscripts are being sought on the topic of Patient-Centered Care for a special issue of
Issues in Mental Health Nursing. The journal is peer-reviewed and indexed in PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and many other databases. 2015 is its 36dI year of publication. Its impact factor will be released early in 2016.
Papers will be considered that provide a context for patient-centered care, and can be research-focused, practice-oriented, or theoretical/conceptual in nature. A broad range of topics will be considered including comparative clinical effectiveness research, patient-centered mental healthcare delivery, outcomes of patient-centered care research/practice, mental health care decision-making, navigating the mental health care system, community engagement, methods for engagement of patients and other stakeholders, innovation and interventions related to patient-centered care.
The special issue is slated to appear in print in June, 2016. However, accepted manuscripts will be available to readers online ahead-of-print.
Deadline: Manuscripts must be received by December 31, 2015.
Issues in Mental Health Nursing requires APA format. There is no specified page limit, but most papers range from 15 to 25 pages of double-spaced text. Accuracy in citations is imperative.
Please send all manuscripts to: Indicate in your cover letter that you would like for your paper to be considered for the special issue.
Manuscripts will be reviewed by guest editor Dr. Donna Neff, Associate Professor at University of Central Florida College of Nursing, Florida, USA, and by reviewers who are blinded to the identity of authors.
Queries may be addressed to editor-in-chief Sandra P. Thomas,

CFS: “Trauma” (The Lumen)

The Lumen is an annual Edinburgh University new writing and arts journal of the mutual dialogue between medicine, the arts and the humanities. We hope to foster creative and critical discourse on the personal experience of illness and healthcare. The Lumen will provide a space for the expression of the deeply personal narratives of the medical encounter, from patients and healthcare professionals alike, and the aspects of the human condition that it exposes. We are pleased to announce that we are now accepting submissions for the Summer 2016 issue of The Lumen. The theme for this issue will be ‘Trauma’.

Contributors are welcome to interpret this theme in any way they wish along the lines of any discipline. We also welcome reviews of books or other artistic work that deals with a discussion of trauma or narratives that emerge thereof. Some possible interpretations of this theme could be:

  • The impact of a traumatic event or process on identity and temporality
  • Narrating and coping with traumatic events
  • Talking about trauma in public discourse
  • The form and essence of traumatic change
  • Trauma as a permanent state of being rather than a singular, momentary breach
  • The trauma of internal processes rather than external intrusions
  • Historical, political or socio-symbolic forms of trauma

The above list is not exhaustive, and is merely indicative of some of the possible interpretations of the theme for the forthcoming issue. Contributors are welcome to interpret the theme however they like.

We welcome submissions in the following categories:

  • Fiction: Short fiction which is no more than 3,000 words in length and can be written in any style or genre. Stories should be stand-alone and complete works.
  • Non-fiction: Narrative/memoir or essays (either critical or academic) that are no longer than 3,000 words in length.
  • Poetry: Poems that are no longer than 70 lines in length in any style, genre or form.
  • Reviews: Short reviews of one work (between 500 and 750 words) or comparative reviews of two or more works (between 750 and 1,000 words). If you would like to review a relevant literary or artistic work or performance, please contact us with a proposal via email and we shall consider it. Alternatively, we will also post a list of works we would like reviewed on our web site.
  • Visual Art: All forms of visual art (illustrations, photographs, et cetera), submitted as digital images (preferably high-resolution .jpeg) of up to 10 MB in file size. Please include the title, date, medium and size as applicable. If you should encounter any difficulty in sending us images via email due to file size, please contact us to arrange an alternative mode of submission.

The deadline for submissions for this issue is Friday, 4 December, 2015. All submissions must be sent on or before this date via email.

In addition, The Lumen also welcomes contributions for its blog on a rolling basis. These contributions can also be stories, poetry, essays, reviews, et cetera as per the guidelines below. These need not necessarily relate to the theme for the print issue, and can be on any subject or theme. We are also open to suggestions for blog posts. Please feel free to contact the editors at the above email address if you would like to make a suggestion for a piece.

For further details, please refer to the full Call for Submissions. Any queries regarding submissions can be addressed to the editors.