Predatory Publishers Get Attention of Feds

We have reported here frequently in the past concerning the proliferation of predatory online open-access publishing operations, their use of email spam, and their adjunct conference operations. Frequently we’ve referred readers to Jeffrey Beall’s ScholarlyOA Web site.

Now in a new twist it’s gotten serious: the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has taken notice.

As reported in a recent InsideHigherEd article: “The Federal Trade Commission on Friday filed a complaint against the academic journal publisher OMICS Group and two of its subsidiaries, saying the publisher deceives scholars and misrepresents the editorial rigor of its journals.”

Details of the charges can be found here on the FTC Web site.

As recently as 2013 OMICS was threatening to sue Beall with a one billion dollar claim.

Shakespeare Anniversary/”Nursing”

Today marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Shakespeare provides us with the earliest attestation of the word nurse as denoting one who provides health care to the sick, which appears in Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (ca. 1590s): “I will attend my husband, be his nurse, Diet his sicknesse, for it is my Office” (V.i.99).

The wife as nurse (and the advantage of marriage as engaging a live-in nurse) is also apparent in the Duchess of Newcastle’s Matrimonial Trouble (1662), which contends, “That he might do [i.e., marry], if it were for no other reason, but for a Nurse to tend him, if he should chance to be sick.”

To mark this Shakespeare anniversary, the Wellcome Library’s blog comments on “Shakespeare’s Medical World”: http://blog.wellcomelibrary.org/2016/04/shakespeares-medical-world/

 

ANF 10,000 Nurses on Boards Coalition

Visibility and voice are important themes in the history of nursing. Nursing silence and invisibility doesn’t just impair the profession of nursing; it also deprives health professions and society in general from important insights and advocacy.

The 10,000 Nurses on Boards Coalition with the American Nurses Foundation is a national initiative to promote, prepare, and monitor nurse engagement on boards of directors in the United States. This is an important role for nurse leaders to engage in decision making for healthcare transformation as recommended in the 2010 IOM report, The Future of Nursing. Nurses’ voices must be heard at the table!

We now announce the 10,000 Nurses on Boards database. This database will be used to monitor the number of nurses on boards and collect information about nurses who are searching for boards on which to serve. Please take the time to peruse the website and enter your information if this is relevant for you. Also please feel free to pass the link along to your colleagues.

http://nursesonboardscoalition.org/

Post-Publication Peer Review?

A growing number of reports in a variety of media point to problems with pre-publication peer review. Now anonymous group has created a mechanism for post-publication peer review. A wave of the future? They are interviewed here: http://www.vox.com/2015/3/14/8203595/pubpeer (“Why you can’t always believe what you read in scientific journals”). Their web site, PubPeer: The Online Journal Club can be found here: https://pubpeer.com/

Scholarly Kitchen: Why Is Science Suffering in the Modern Age?

Kent Anderson writing for the Scholarly Kitchen (“What’s Hot and Cooking in Scholarly Publishing”) asks, “Why is science suffering in the modern age?” Among the causes of the crisis of public confidence in science:

  1. Political and societal dysfunction.
  2. Economic dysfunction.
  3. Mass media dysfunction.
  4. Scientific dysfunction.

Admitting the complexities of the first three, Anderson observes of the last: “Scientists need to become better communicators.”

The article is available on line: http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2015/02/17/taking-our-eye-off-the-ball-why-is-science-suffering-in-the-modern-age/

TIME Person of the Year: Ebola Nurses

The Ebola Nurses: In their own words

http://time.com/time-person-of-the-year-ebola-nurses/

On-Line Journal Publishes Article Authored by Characters from “The Simpsons”

Would you like to be published in the same journal that accepted a manuscript written by “Margaret Simpson” and “Edna Krabappel”? If those names sound familiar, it’s not because they’re distinguished researchers. They’re not. They’re not even real people. They’re characters on the long-running evening cartoon situation comedy The Simpsons.

But the “editors” of an American Scientific Publishers journal didn’t know that, or they didn’t care, as reported by Joseph Stromberg for Voxhttp://www.vox.com/2014/12/7/7339587/simpsons-science-paper

While Jeffrey Beall’s ScholarlyOA website http://scholarlyoa.com/publishers/ has long warned us to the perils of responding to email spam from probably predatory online open-access journals, some intrepid scholars have been writing bogus manuscripts, submitting them, and even paying the publishing fee just to show that these publishing emperors are, as we say in the South, butt nekkid.

In another indication of how unscrupulous some of these publishers can be, Stromberg also reports on one manuscript accepted for publication whose title was “Get me off Your F*****g Mailing List” (a title we’ve censored for the eyes of our more sensitive readers), whose text consisted of the same sentence as the title repeated; details here: http://www.vox.com/2014/11/21/7259207/scientific-paper-scam

While you might have like a guest appearance on The Simpsons, you probably wouldn’t want to appear in the same journal with those characters. So two words to the wise author considering an online open-access journal: Caveat scriptor.