CFP: Broken Narratives and the Lived Body Conference

Call for Proposals: Broken Narratives and the Lived Body Conference
This conference will take an interdisciplinary approach to ‘broken narratives’, embodiment and the ‘lived body’. Contributions are invited from researchers in the social sciences, humanities, and in medicine. Contributors are invited to examine the topics outlined below, through theoretical, theoretically informed empirical research, and in relation (but not limited) to a range of psychiatric diagnoses, neurological illnesses and cognitive ‘impairments’; persons who are neurodiverse (e.g. who live with autism); psychological traumas; and life-threatening illnesses.
Abstract of 250 words, 5 keywords, and up to 100 word author bio is due by 30 November, 2015. Acceptance notice will be given mid Dec, 2015. Completed drafts of maximum 8,000 words are due by end of March, 2016.

Revise and Resubmit

Summer is often a time when we undertake what seems to be the onerous work of revising and resubmitting manuscripts. However, even when an editor provides numerous comments, the good news is that the readers and editor are interested in your work. Writing for Inside Higher Ed, Michael S. Harris offers good advice for working through revision for resubmission:
  • Read through comments and edits.
  • Create a master to-do list.
  • Work through your master to-do list.
  • Review the editor’s letter and reviewers’ comments.
  • Write a response letter to the editor.
  • Resubmit your manuscript and celebrate.

CFS: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics: A Journal of Qualitative Research is a peer-reviewed journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press.  We seek manuscripts in the following two areas:

1.        Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research Articles. NIB welcomes submitted papers that report on qualitative and mixed methods research studies, including ethnographic, interview, focus group, observational, mixed methods, and related studies in the areas of bioethics, human research ethics, or health care ethics. A variety of approaches to inquiry are welcome, including narrative, phenomenological, grounded theory, ethnographic, and case study approaches.

2.        Case Studies. Case study articles are stand-alone articles that include an in-depth description and analysis of one or more instructive cases from health care that involve an ethical problem. NIB welcomes case studies on a variety of subjects including clinical care of patients, institutional undertakings, and policy initiatives. Case studies should be rich in description and should contain an analysis of the case that explores how the ethical challenges might best be addressed and what can be learned from the case.

Author Guidelines and further information about the Journal are available at:

Janet Lyon: My first life as a nurse

Sometimes an English professor becomes a nurse, as in the case of Theresa Brown, but sometimes it happens the other way around. Penn State Professor of English Janet Lyon writes in the Los Angeles Review of Books:

Jason Priem presents Altmetrics at Purdue University, February 14, 2012

This presentation featured Jason Priem from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill discussing the future of scientific communication. Jason is with the school of information and library science and his talk was entitled: Toward a Second Revolution: altmetrics, total-impact, and the Decoupled Journal.
For a complete set of slides from this presentation go to:


Crossing the Pubicon: Adults Only?

I got a chuckle yesterday from Jeffrey Beall’s warning email about a new probably predatory online open access publisher calling itself “Pubicon.”

Now, Julius Caesar famously crossed the “Rubicon,” and changed the course of history.

But, really? “Pubicon”? Does you mother know you’re using language like that? Sounds to me like the witticism of a sophomore Latin student.

Details here:

Why Predatory Publishing Can Be Harmful

The ever-vigilant Jeffrey Beall in a recent post on his web site ScholarlyOA reported on a case in which an unwitting journalist picked up on a spurious article published by an unreliable online open-access publisher. The journalist took the conclusions of a flawed study and presented them as a scientific consensus.

Predatory online open-access publishing not only cheapens the value of scholarly work but also disguises bogus science as valid and reliable, which can continue to circulate through the knowledge ecosystem.

Details here:


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