Socioeconomic Factors and Mental Health: Past and Present (CfP, Palgrave Communications)

Socioeconomic Factors and Mental Health: Past and Present (CfP, Palgrave Communications)

Palgrave Communications – the multidisciplinary, open access journal published by Palgrave Macmillan – is currently inviting article proposals and full papers for a new research article collection. ‘Socioeconomic Factors and Mental Health: Past and Present’ will be edited by Professor Matthew Smith and Dr Lucas Richert (University of Strathclyde, UK).

This article collection will examine how the relationship between socioeconomic factors and mental health has been and is understood in an array of different places and periods. Although much of the focus of current mental health research and clinical practice is on the neurological aspects of mental illness and psychopharmacological treatment, historical research demonstrates that a wide range of factors – from vitamin deficiencies such as pellagra, and infections such as syphilis to traumatic life events – have contributed to the onset and exacerbation of mental health problems. Among all these factors, one looms largest: socioeconomic status. On the one hand, socioeconomic inequality has been long recognised as a potential cause of mental illness, as the history of mental hygiene and social psychiatry during much of the twentieth century demonstrates. On the other hand, however, the mentally ill have also historically faced much socioeconomic hardship; today, a high proportion of the homeless and incarcerated in many countries suffer from mental illness.

By exploring this topic across time and place, this collection aims to provide a historical context for today’s mental health crisis, and also to inform current mental health policy, especially attempts to prevent or alleviate mental illness through social change.

Insights on a broad spectrum of themes are welcomed, including, but not restricted to:

  • Homelessness and mental illness
  • Social psychiatry and mental hygiene
  • Community mental health
  • Forensic psychiatry
  • Race and mental health
  • Psychiatry and various economic/political systems (e.g., communism, socialism, capitalism)
  • Socioeconomic factors and child mental health
  • How health professionals deal with poverty and mental health
  • Social policy and mental health
  • Social activism and mental health

This is a rolling article collection and as such proposals and submissions will be welcome before 01 February 2018. Article proposals should be submitted to the editorial team.

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NIH Statement on Article Publication Resulting from NIH Funded Research

 


Notice Number: NOT-OD-18-011

 

Purpose

To protect the credibility of published research, authors are encouraged to publish papers arising from NIH-funded research in reputable journals.

Background

Effective communication of scientific results is an essential part of the scientific process. In support of public access to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded research, authors are encouraged to publish their results in reputable journals. The NIH has noted an increase in the numbers of papers reported as products of NIH funding which are published in journals or by publishers that do not follow best practices promoted by professional scholarly publishing organizations. These journals and publishers typically can be identified by several attributes, including:

  • misleading pricing (e.g., lack of transparency about article processing charges);
  • failure to disclose information to authors;
  • aggressive tactics to solicit article submissions;
  • inaccurate statements about editorial board membership; and
  • misleading or suspicious peer-review processes.

Publications using such practices may call into question the credibility of the research they report.

Recommendations to identify credible journals

To help protect the credibility of papers arising from its research investment, NIH encourages its stakeholders, including grantees, contractors, intramural researchers, and librarians, to help authors:

  • Adhere to the principles of research integrity and publication ethics;
  • Identify journals that follow best practices promoted by professional scholarly publishing organizations; and
  • Avoid publishing in journals that do not have a clearly stated and rigorous peer review process.

Existing resources can assist in this process.  Guidance for researchers include:
Think Check Submit, a publishing industry resource; and
Academics and scientists: Beware of predatory journal publishers,” information from the Federal Trade Commission.

The National Library of Medicine, the NIH entity that maintains PubMed and PubMed Central, encourages publishers to follow established industry best practices including:

Please direct all inquiries to:
Office of Extramural Research
Email: PublicAccess@nih.gov
Website: http://publicaccess.nih.gov

Nursing Uniforms

Seniors in their final semester take a survey of American nursing’s history — Nursing’s Past as Prologue — encountering objects and documents from the Dolan Collection, including nursing uniforms of the past.

UConn Nursing Uniforms

Just announced! Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice

INANE - International Academy of Nursing Editors

We have received news that the journal Clinical Scholars Review is now the Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice.  The new Editor-in-Chief is Stephen Ferrara, DNP, FNP, FAANP.  We have updated the listing of the journal in the Journals Directory.

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice is a biannual, peer reviewed publication focused on presenting articles that demonstrate clinical excellence in the application ofjdnp evidence-based practice of doctoral nursing. Articles submitted for consideration discuss clinical practice and patient care; case studies; practice issues, including management, scope of practice, and reimbursement; ethical dilemmas, legal issues, and business practices; and innovative methods of teaching and evaluating advanced practice and profiling the scholarly nature of the clinical practice of nursing. The mission of Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice is to support the advancement of the doctoral practice of nursing.

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Your Research and Journalistic Media

While peer-reviewed scholarly journal publication is the goal of most researchers and scholars, you might also be attentive to the ways that you can bring your findings and work to a larger popular audience.

Journalists and other news media professionals are often interested in publicizing interesting research.

However, as John Oliver recently explained in his Last Week Tonight feature on scientific studies, the nuances of science are often lost on journalists (as well as their readers and viewers).

Inside Higher Ed editor Scott Jaschik offered some canny advice to researchers on how to work with journalists in his “Faculty and the Fourth Estate” (published by the AAUP in 2010).

What to do before a reporter calls (or before you call a reporter) is also the topic of a recent blog post on Tenure, She Wrote.

Inside Higher Ed: A Research Group of One’s Own

English novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf famously declared that a productive writing career required “a room of one’s own” and observed that historically women lacked such a room (as well as the uninterrupted time to use it).

Women academics may have the literal room but often lack room in their schedule because they tend to take on more service roles than men and spend less time on research, as reported in Inside Higher Ed.

However, women at Texas Tech and Indiana University are making room for research with faculty writing groups, which have been so productive that there has been a request for co-ed groups as well.

Details here: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/07/01/encouraging-female-faculty-publish-research

Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know About Scholarly Publishing

Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf writing for the Scholarly Kitchen (“What’s hot and cooking in scholarly publishing”) explain the ecosystem, “scholarly hygiene,” business models, peer review, metrics, tools, and licenses and copyright.