Summer’s Here: Make Progress on Writing Projects

Summer has officially arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, when many faculty have reduced or no teaching, so it’s a time to make progress on writing projects.

Theresa MacPhail writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education‘s Vitae admonishes that we make a realistic writing schedule:

“Stop thinking about your writing in terms of large projects . . .
Set up a realistic writing schedule and then (mostly) stick to it . . . [and]
Writer, know thyself.”

The article is available on line to subscribers: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/1044-a-realistic-summer-writing-schedule

Summer’s Here: Time to Get Writing!

Writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education‘s professional website Vitae, Joli Jensen, Hazel Rogers Professor of Communication at The University of Tulsa, reminds us “The semester is over! It’s time to write!” However, she also admonishes us to have a plan in order to get writing done:

  • Start with realistic scholarly and relaxation objectives.
  • Deploy basic productivity techniques.
  • Secure writing time, space and energy.
  • Keep a personal log and create an accountability system.
  • But cut yourself some slack.

When Reviewers Disagree (or at least contradict each other)

Karen Kelsky, writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Vitae explores the problem when two or more readers’ reports offer conflicting or contradictory suggestions for revision and resubmission. She advises: 1) You don’t have to accept every revision suggestion (though you need to address all of them); reviewers aren’t necessarily experts in your topic so you can disagree with them; and 3) letting go of ego, you can find revision suggestions helpful. The article is on line for subscribers: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/954-when-the-reviewers-disagree

Fail and Fail Often!

Writing for Inside Higher Ed, Kenneth Womack and Nichola D. Gutgold advise junior tenure track faculty:

The best advice we ever received when we were on the tenure track was that to be successful, we needed to keep sending our research out. We needed to work feverishly to develop an audience. In short, you have to be ready to respond quickly — or fail fast. Because what is failure? Is it merely a temporary result or a protracted state of mind? Consider the words of playwright Samuel Beckett: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Full essay here: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/04/01/essay-importance-sharing-work-and-facing-rejection-advance-scholarly-career

 

Scholarly Kitchen: Why Is Science Suffering in the Modern Age?

Kent Anderson writing for the Scholarly Kitchen (“What’s Hot and Cooking in Scholarly Publishing”) asks, “Why is science suffering in the modern age?” Among the causes of the crisis of public confidence in science:

  1. Political and societal dysfunction.
  2. Economic dysfunction.
  3. Mass media dysfunction.
  4. Scientific dysfunction.

Admitting the complexities of the first three, Anderson observes of the last: “Scientists need to become better communicators.”

The article is available on line: http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2015/02/17/taking-our-eye-off-the-ball-why-is-science-suffering-in-the-modern-age/

Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers

Director of the Office of Copyright and Scholarly Communication at Duke University, Kevin Smith has published Owning and Using Scholarship: An IP Handbook for Teachers and Researchers. Published by the Association of College and Research Libraries and available in an open-access PDF version, the book provides scholars with a primer to intellectual property issues in the digital age:

http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital/9780838987483_copyright_OA.pdf

 

Inside Higher Ed: Welcome criticism (Rockquemore)

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, writing for Inside Higher Ed, advises early-career researchers and scholars to welcome criticism rather than to become frustrated or dispirited by it.

It’s all about context, including the context of your reaction, as well as seeking out the advice of trusted colleagues: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/01/28/essay-how-those-starting-academic-careers-should-respond-criticism

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