CFP: 14th International Conference on Communication, Medicine, and Ethics

We are pleased to announce the first call for proposals for the 14th International Conference on Communication, Medicine, and Ethics (COMET), which will be hosted by The Danish Institute of Humanities and Medicine (DIHM).

The COMET conference aims to bring together scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds involving various healthcare specialties and the human and social sciences. A special emphasis is on the dissemination of on-going research in language/discourse/communication studies in relation to healthcare education, patient participation and professional ethics.

The submission for proposals opens on 30 October 2015. All proposals must be submitted by 21 December 2015.

Conference themes include:

• Client-Professional Encounters (involving doctors, counsellors, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, speech and language therapists, psychotherapists, etc.)
• Communicating Risk and Uncertainty
• Communication Skills Training
• Distributed Expertise among Professionals and Clients
• Ethics and Communication
• Evidence in Diagnosis and Non-Diagnosis
• Health and Disability
• Health, Wellbeing and the Lifespan
• Health Literacy
• Interpreter Mediated Healthcare Delivery
• Interprofessional Communication and Hospital Management Systems
• Media and Health Communication
• Medical Education
• Narratives of Illness Experience
• Public Understanding of Health and Illness
• Quality of Life and Quality of Care
• Representation of the Body
• Research Ethics
• Role of Health Technologies and Medical Informatics
• (Shared) Decision Making
• Tailoring Health Messages
• Telemedicine
• Values and Responsibilities in Professional Practice

Submission Guidelines

Proposals must be submitted via email to
Proposals include panels, roundtables and individual presentations (oral or poster).
For all submissions, clearly indicate:
• Abstract title, author names, and full institutional affiliations of the responsible (presenting) author and collaborating authors.
• Contact e-mail address and phone number for the responsible author.
• Up to three conference themes (feel free to indicate themes beyond the list above).

Panels should address a common theme, content or methodological area, and will be scheduled for 90 minutes.
In addition to individual proposals (no more than 250 words each), please also submit an overview description of no more than 300 words highlighting the panel’s content and objectives. Provide information about the panel members and the coordinator, stating full institutional affiliations and e-mail addresses.

Proposals for individual papers (no more than 250 words) must clearly indicate a preference for oral or poster presentation. Following the peer review process, the organisers will determine whether a proposal is selected for oral or poster presentation. Poster presenters must be physically present to discuss their work during the dedicated sessions. Oral presentations will typically be scheduled in sessions of 90 minutes, with 30 minutes (20 minutes for presentation + 10 minutes for discussion) allocated to each individual presentation.

Proposals for work-in-progress roundtables should be no more than 250 words targeted at oral presentation. The roundtables will be in sessions of 90 minutes, with individual presentations lasting 30 minutes (15 minutes for presentation + 15 minutes for discussion). This format is particularly suitable for early career researchers pursuing doctoral and postdoctoral studies and for experienced researchers undertaking/planning pilot projects or interested in reporting preliminary results. Please indicate clearly if your proposal falls into this category.

Proposal submission deadline: 21 December 2015.

Proposal Selection Criteria

All proposals undergo a double blind peer-review process.
Please note that COMET conference policy is one main oral presentation per author. You may choose to submit more than one proposal, but normally only one proposal will be accepted for oral presentation. Any additional accepted proposals may be presented as poster(s).
There is no fixed template for writing proposals but authors are urged to attend to the following criteria which will form the basis for peer review:
• originality of the topic and its relevance to the conference
• background contextualisation of the study
• relationship between title and content
• structural organisation
• theoretical/methodological appropriateness
• clarity of claims and relevance
Individual panels are reviewed in their entirety on the above criteria but also on the basis of their relevance to broader issues in communication, medicine, and ethics; the overall coherence of the proposal; and the usefulness of the panel to participants.
Decisions about acceptance/rejection will be communicated by mid February 2016. Following formal acceptance, the responsible (presenting) authors must register participation prior to the finalisation of the conference programme. Early registration opens on 1 March 2016.
Please visit or send an email for further details regarding submission guidelines, registration, schedule and more.

CFP: Workshops/Sexual Minority Youth Conference

True Colors XXIII: Intersectionality will be held on Friday, March 18th & Saturday, March 19, 2016 at UConn in Storrs, CT.

Workshop Proposal Form

Still the largest and most comprehensive LGBTQA and ally youth issues conference in the world, this two day event brings together the best minds across an array of disciplines:

  • Professional Best Practices in child welfare, juvenile justice, clinical treatment, K-12 education, college environment and curricula, administration, policy
  • Advocacy workshops for youth and adults
  • Spiritual Institute
  • Workshops for parents and other family members, youth and allies

For the first time, we will be hosting a track for the families of prepuberty gender expansive, gender creative and transgender children on Saturday!

The due date is November 15th at 5:00 PM.  


Workshop Proposal Form

The Writing Process Explained


CFS: Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health

Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health (International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics)

Although by no means mainstream, phenomenological approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine are no longer novel. Such approaches take the lived body – as opposed the body understood as a material, biological object – as a point of departure. Such approaches are also invested in a detailed examination and articulation of a plurality of diverse subjective experiences, as opposed to reifying experience under the rubric of “the subject” or “the patient.” Phenomenological approaches to bioethics and medicine have broached topics such as pain, trauma, illness, death, and bodily alienation – to name just a few – and our understandings of these topics have benefitted from and are deepened by being analyzed using the tools of phenomenology.
There is also a rich history of approaching phenomenology from a feminist perspective. Combining these two approaches and methodologies has furthered our understandings of lived experiences of marginalization, invisibility, nonnormativity, and oppression. Approaching phenomenology from a feminist perspective has also broadened the subject matter of traditional phenomenology to include analyses of sexuality, sexual difference, pregnancy, and birth. Moreover, feminist phenomenological accounts of embodiment have also helped to broaden more traditional philosophical understandings and discussions of what singular bodies are and of how they navigate the world as differently sexed, gendered, racialized, aged, weighted, and abled. Feminist phenomenological accounts and analyses have helped to draw to the fore the complicated ways in which identities intersect and have made the case that if we are really to understand first person embodied accounts of experience, then a traditional phenomenological account of “the subject” simply does not suffice.
The aim of this International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics special issue (11.1) is to explore and develop the connections between feminist phenomenology, philosophy of medicine, bioethics, and health. The issue will consider on the one hand, how feminist phenomenology can enhance and deepen our understanding of issues within medicine, bioethics, and health, and on the other hand, whether and how feminist approaches to medicine, bioethics, and health can help to advance the phenomenological project.
Topics appropriate to the special issue include, but are not limited to, feminist phenomenological analyses and/or critiques of:
  •  Health, illness, and healthcare
  • Social determinants of health (e.g., food justice, environmental justice, labor equity, transnational inequities)
  • Negotiating medical bureaucracies and access to care
  • Health/care in constrained circumstances (i.e., in prisons, as migrants, in conditions without secure health insurance)
  • Sex and gender
  • Rape, sexual violence, or domestic violence
  • Transgender and trans* experiences of embodiment, health, or healthcare
  • Intersex experiences of embodiment, health, or healthcare
  • Death and dying
  • Palliative care and end of life
  • Caregiving for ill friends, family members, and children
  • Pregnancy, labor, childbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Abortion, contraception, sterilization
  • Organ transplantation
  • Cosmetic surgery
  • Body weight
  • Addiction
  • Mental illness
  • Physical and cognitive disability
 Submission Information: Word limit for essays: 8000 words. IJFAB also welcomes submissions in these additional categories:
  •  Conversations provide a forum for public dialogue on particular issues in bioethics. Scholars engaged in fruitful exchanges are encouraged to share those discussions here. Submissions for this section are usually 3,000–5,000 words.
  • Commentaries offer an opportunity for short analyses (under 4,000 words) of specific policy issues, legislation, court decisions, or other contemporary developments within bioethics.
  • Narratives often illuminate clinical practice or ethical thinking. IJFAB invites narratives that shed light on aspects of health, health care, or bioethics. Submissions for the section are usually in the range of 3,000–5,000 words.
 Deadline for submissions: February 1, 2017
Anonymous review: All submissions are subject to triple anonymous peer review. The Editorial Office aims to return an initial decision to authors within eight weeks. Authors are frequently asked to revise and resubmit based on extensive reviewer comments. The Editorial Office aims to return a decision on revised papers within four-six weeks.
Submissions should be emailed indicating special issue “Feminist Phenomenology and Medicine” in the subject heading.
All submissions should conform to IJFAB style guidelines. For further details, please check the IJFAB website.
For further information regarding the special issue please email the Guest Editor Lauren Freeman at the Department of Philosophy University of Louisville.

CFP: Nursing History Book Series

Call for Proposals in a New Series: Nursing History: Narratives for the Twenty-First Century

Series Editors: Julie A. Fairman and Patricia D’Antonio, Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania

This series features nurses as critical actors in driving social, cultural, professional, and clinical changes while delivering health care. Offering fresh and well-researched approaches to nursing history, books in the series will seek to engage a readership both within and beyond academe.  The focus primarily will be on books intended for understanding and teaching the importance of the history of nursing for all students and scholars in health care in and beyond the classroom.

Books in the series will place nurses and nursing within significant contexts to illustrate the professions’ engagement in critical social issues and movements of the last century.  In many ways, this perspective will challenge what we already know about this period, as it has typically been seen through the eyes of the history of medicine, science, public health, and technology.

Book proposals must conform to the guidelines of the publisher, the Johns Hopkins University Press. Queries should be sent to with the subject heading “Hopkins Proposal.” Final book manuscripts should be no longer than 80,000 to 90,000 words and may include up to twenty illustrations. Books appearing in the series will be published simultaneously in print and electronic editions.

Contact: *Julie Fairman, Patricia D’Antonio

Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

*Primary Contact

Inside Higher Ed: How to Get Writing Done

Writing for Inside Higher Ed, Melissa Dennihy explains methods for successfully developing manuscripts for publication:

  • Scheduling with yourself a weekly research day
  • Daily writing (even if it’s only 500 words)
  • Identifying a potential publication venue while you’re researching and writing
  • Connect the classroom and your research

The article is available on line open access:

CFS: Patient-Centered Care, Mental Health Svcs

Special issue of Issues in Mental Health Nursing on the topic of PATIENT-CENTERED CARE: A FOCUS IN PROVISION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Manuscripts are being sought on the topic of Patient-Centered Care for a special issue of
Issues in Mental Health Nursing. The journal is peer-reviewed and indexed in PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and many other databases. 2015 is its 36dI year of publication. Its impact factor will be released early in 2016.
Papers will be considered that provide a context for patient-centered care, and can be research-focused, practice-oriented, or theoretical/conceptual in nature. A broad range of topics will be considered including comparative clinical effectiveness research, patient-centered mental healthcare delivery, outcomes of patient-centered care research/practice, mental health care decision-making, navigating the mental health care system, community engagement, methods for engagement of patients and other stakeholders, innovation and interventions related to patient-centered care.
The special issue is slated to appear in print in June, 2016. However, accepted manuscripts will be available to readers online ahead-of-print.
Deadline: Manuscripts must be received by December 31, 2015.
Issues in Mental Health Nursing requires APA format. There is no specified page limit, but most papers range from 15 to 25 pages of double-spaced text. Accuracy in citations is imperative.
Please send all manuscripts to: Indicate in your cover letter that you would like for your paper to be considered for the special issue.
Manuscripts will be reviewed by guest editor Dr. Donna Neff, Associate Professor at University of Central Florida College of Nursing, Florida, USA, and by reviewers who are blinded to the identity of authors.
Queries may be addressed to editor-in-chief Sandra P. Thomas,

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 206 other followers