Midsummer Writing Advice

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, Ph.D., president of the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity and columnist for Inside Higher Ed, observes that we are at summer’s mid-point and advises those who have so far not made progress on their writing projects:

  1. Forgive yourself.
  2. Commit to a 14-day challenge.
  3. Pick one goal for those 14 days.
  4. Turn off all distractions and set a timer.
  5. Don’t go it alone.

Her essay is on line, open access: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2016/07/06/advice-how-get-yourself-out-writing-rut-essay

Poorly Written Spam from Predatory Journal

This spam solicitation in today’s email was so poorly written that I could not resist sharing it with readers of NursingWriting.com

Nxxx Pxxx and Cxxx journal asking you to send manuscript to publish under a single roof with Pxxx. You are free to gain the below features:

Express review process

Get processing confirmation (accept or reject by quality team) from Editorial Office within 24-48 hours when the time of submission

Review process within 3 weeks of time frame.

Article published instantly with Editor final acceptance.

Indexing
Cite Factor, Research Bib, SHERPA/ROMEO, ISI and more….

You can send an article by the reply to this email.

I strongly believe that I could have a submission from you within the deadline: July 15th 2016.

[Memo to Editor: I strongly believe that you could not have a submission from me . . . ever.]

 

 

Warning: Predatory Conference Organizers

If you thought it was difficult to assess whether or not a solicitation to submit a manuscript to an online open-access journal is legitimate, now comes the spawn of predatory journals: predatory conferences. To help us sort out the claims of conference participation solicitations, Jeffrey Beall’s ScholarlyOA web site provides a draft of criteria for identifying predatory conferences, written by James McCrostie, a full-time associate professor and part-time journalist in Japan who has written about such conferences.

https://scholarlyoa.com/2016/06/23/proposed-criteria-for-identifying-predatory-conferences/

Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know About Scholarly Publishing

Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf writing for the Scholarly Kitchen (“What’s hot and cooking in scholarly publishing”) explain the ecosystem, “scholarly hygiene,” business models, peer review, metrics, tools, and licenses and copyright.

CFP: Reducing Induction, C-section (JOGNN)

The Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing (JOGNN) is soliciting systematic reviews on interdisciplinary strategies to reduce elective induction of labor, to reduce cesarean deliveries among nulliparous women with single, head down fetuses at 37 weeks or more gestation, or to increase vaginal birth after cesarean delivery.

JOGNN is a premier resource for health care professionals committed to clinical scholarship that advances the health care of women and newborns. With a focus on nursing practice, JOGNN addresses the latest research, practice issues, policies, opinions, and trends in the care of women, childbearing families, and newborns.

Submit here: http://www.editorialmanager.com/jognn/default.aspx

Journal info here: http://www.jognn.org/

“40 Things Editors Won’t Tell You (But You Need to Know)”

Cynthia Saver, writing in Nurse Author & Editor, reveals “40 Things Editors Won’t Tell You (But You Need to Know).”

These tips include several topics: Getting Published; Cover Letters; Writing; Civility; Peer Review; Editing; Student Papers; Reporting Research; Ethics; Rejection; and Editors.

The article is available on line and open access: http://naepub.com/publishing/2016-26-1-6/

Shakespeare Anniversary/”Nursing”

Today marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Shakespeare provides us with the earliest attestation of the word nurse as denoting one who provides health care to the sick, which appears in Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors (ca. 1590s): “I will attend my husband, be his nurse, Diet his sicknesse, for it is my Office” (V.i.99).

The wife as nurse (and the advantage of marriage as engaging a live-in nurse) is also apparent in the Duchess of Newcastle’s Matrimonial Trouble (1662), which contends, “That he might do [i.e., marry], if it were for no other reason, but for a Nurse to tend him, if he should chance to be sick.”

To mark this Shakespeare anniversary, the Wellcome Library’s blog comments on “Shakespeare’s Medical World”: http://blog.wellcomelibrary.org/2016/04/shakespeares-medical-world/