CFP: 4th Global Conference Making Sense of Pain

4th Global Conference Making Sense of: Pain | Thursday 9th May – Saturday 11th May 2013, Prague, Czech Republic

Call for Presentations: What is pain? What is the meaning of pain? How can we attempt to make sense of it—and should we?

Pain is a complex multi-layered, multi-leveled phenomenon. Standard definitions of pain view it primarily in physical terms as being a life-preserving response to negative stimuli in sentient beings. It is something that happens to and/or in parts of the body. It is described in terms of physical qualities, as an object to be observed, assessed, analysed, managed, overcome and/or eliminated. At the same time, pain is something we experience, endure, live through and, at times, die from. It is something which intrudes into our sense of who we are, our sense of embodiment, our desires and our fears. It becomes the basis of stories, narratives, reports and observations we tell to others. The telling is addressed and attuned to the context of the other – the clinical, the professional, the social.

Pain also sits as a nexus at the centre of innumerable intersecting relationships. In cultures for whom self-inflicted pain is a means of experiencing vitality, pain, body and self are critically linked. This principle recognizably appears in aspects of ritual, of consumption, of sexuality, of psychological pain, of dissociation and body dismorphia. In so many ways, in sickness and in health, pain is the means by which we navigate the vulnerable, permeable boundary betweenourselves and others—the inside and outside of our bodies and minds.

What tools can we bring when grappling with and trying to make sense of, pain? This inter- and transdisciplinary conference provides a forum for inquiry into the vicissitudes of pain: its nature and significance biologically, anthropologically, historically, culturally and socially. More specifically, as a means of probing the boundaries, this conference aims to create a dialogue between disparate as well as overlapping fields of study: the boundaries of disciplines as well as the boundaries of sensation—our suffering, our pleasure, ourselves.

We particularly welcome the perspectives of medical anthropologists, medical humanists, medical historians, professionals, physicians, care-givers, patients, and those exploring the boundaries between creative arts and healing, narrative and medicine. The following themes are suggested as guides to the formulation of topics for presentations, papers and workshops:

  • Pain of the physical body
  • Pain and the animal body—sentience and the experiences of pain in animals
  • Pain and ability/disability—chronicity; disability. Associated perspectives – social policy, architecture, law
  • Pain of the psychological and psychosocial self
  • Pain as action/reaction—pain as a weapon. Torture, sadism, self-harm, neglect, abuse and disregard
  • Pain in/as dissociation
  • Pain as a pleasure principle
  • Pain and sexuality studies—sexual identity, transgender and LGBTA, as well as sexual practices
  • Pain as Communication – expressing pain, understanding pain, describing pain, pain as metaphor, silences about pain
  • Representations and expressions of pain—in art, music, cinema, theatre
  • Illness Narratives/Perspectives on pain – patients’ and professionals’
  • The nexus of pain—creative and destructive relationships: suffering andaffliction; anguish, torment; illness and disease
  • Practices, philosophies and dilemmas of overcoming pain– should it be overcome? Personal, professional, cultural, economic and political (macro and micro) perspectives

The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme.

What to Send: 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th January 2013. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 8th March 2013. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.

E-mails should be entitled: PAIN4 Abstract Submission. Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs: Brandy Schillace: bschillace@inter-disciplinary.net  | Rob Fisher: pain4@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: Hub series of ongoing research and publications projects conferences, run within the Probing the Boundaries domain which aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore innovative and challenging routes of intellectual and academic exploration. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume. For further details of the conference, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/pain/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

CFP: Pain, Old Age (Birkbeck)

CALL FOR PAPERS: PAIN AND OLD AGE: THREE CENTURIES OF SUFFERING IN SILENCE?

Public Conference: 27 October 2012 | The Birkbeck Pain Project and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities | Birkbeck, University of London | Organised by Visiting Fellow to the Birkbeck Pain Project, Prof. Lynn Botelho (Department of History, Indiana University of Pennsylvania)

According to the British Pain Society, ‘pain is not a normal part of ageing’ (2008). Yet for generations of older people, pain was something that was intimately tied to the ageing process. For many, it was the body in pain that signalled their entry into old age. Furthermore, the elderly have not wanted to be a ‘burden’ to their families, friends, and support systems, and consequently they often endured pain with a quiet acceptance. When did this relationship between pain and old age undergo such a profound and fundamental shift? Or, did it? Were the elderly in the past always quietly accepting of the aches and pains of a physically declining body? Or did they fight against pain and the very real physical, emotional, and familial restrictions that chronic pain can impose?

This one-day conference explores the nature of pain in old age between the 18th and the 20th centuries. It explicitly does so through the lens of the humanities, rather than hard sciences. The conference strives to be wide-ranging in terms of disciplines, methodologies, and approaches. In doing so, it seeks to engage both panellists and audience in discussion, dialogue, and debate. Our aim is to facilitate new ways of thinking about both the nature of pain and what it meant to be old.

Possible paper topics might include, but are not limited to

  • · Pain, old age and social relationships (partner, children, friends, neighbours)
  • · Pain and sexual relations
  • · The philosophy of pain
  • · Pain and the ageing self
  • · Pain as a marker of old age
  • · Pain, piety, and religion
  • · Representations of pain and old age in literature, art, and autobiography
  • · Pain as a mechanism of self-fashioning
  • · Pain clustering and the loci of pain, including physical, emotional, and spiritual pain
  • · The elderly’s engagement with medicine and medical practitioners
  • · The medical community’s response to pain in the old

Please send a 300-500 word abstract and a short C.V. by email to Lynn Botelho (Botelho@iup.edu) by 1 June 2012.

The conference will be held at Birkbeck, University of London. Further information will be made available online http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bih/ in June, 2012. There is no fee to attend or register for the conference.

More information regarding the The Birkbeck Pain Project is available at: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/our-research/birkbeckpainproject

FUNDED BY THE WELLCOME TRUST

CFP: Pain, Emotion (Conference)

Call for Papers: Pain as Emotion; Emotion as Pain: Perspectives from Modern History | Public conference, 26 October 2012 | The Birkbeck Pain Project and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities. Birkbeck, University of London | Organised by Visiting Fellow to the Birkbeck Pain Project, Rob Boddice, Ph.D (Languages of Emotion Cluster, Freie Universität, Berlin)

‘With the benefit of the past two centuries of scientific work and thought, can one define pain?’ The question was asked by the neuroscientist Edward R. Perl (Nature Reviews: Neuroscience, 8, 2007). He concluded that ‘it seems reasonable to propose pain to be both a specific sensation and an emotion’. With that, the question of physiological pain opens up to those who study the history of emotions, which in turn gives way to new possibilities of understanding the historical and cultural contingencies of physical pain. The statement also begs the question of the extent to which emotion is in fact pain, if pain is in part emotion. Should the histories of anger, fear, anxiety, grief and compassion be studied as varieties of pain? In what ways have they been understood to have a physiological component? Likewise in histories in which physical pain plays a prominent part – the history of medicine notably – how far should our understanding of pain be influenced by the study of emotionologies that determine how the feeling of pain is expressed? How have emotional contexts affected the experience of pain?

This one-day conference will approach these questions by focusing broadly on the dynamics of the emotional, cultural and medical history of pain in the modern period. The conference aims to foster discussion on the importance of emotion as it relates to physical pain and on emotions themselves as varieties of pain, among experts working on the history of science/medicine, the history of the body, and the history of emotions, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts. Possible paper topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Pain and emotion in the laboratory
  • Emotional pain and physiology
  • Aesthetics/sensation
  • Measuring pain, clinically and/or in the vernacular, in historical context
  • Imagining pain in others (humans/animals): compassion, sympathy, empathy
  • Emotions as pain: grief, anxiety, fear, anger, etc.
  • Expressions of the feeling(s) of pain
  • Influence of emotions on bodily pain
  • Psychology and pain
  • Pain and sentiment(ality)
  • Turning off (emotional) pain: brutality, callousness, anaesthetics

Please send abstracts of up to 500 words and a short CV by email to the Birkbeck Pain Project (painproject@bbk.ac.uk) by May 1st, 2012. Questions may be directed to the Pain Project and/or to Rob Boddice (rob.boddice@gmail.com). The workshop will take place at Birkbeck, London University – further information including registration details will be available here (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bih/ ) in May 2012. There is no fee to attend or register for the Workshop. More information regarding The Birkbeck Pain Project is available on the Project website (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/our-research/birkbeckpainproject). Funded by the Wellcome Trust

CFP: Paranoia, Pain

Call for Papers: Paranoia and Pain: Embodied in Psychology, Literature, and Bioscience, University of Liverpool, 2-4 April 2012

http://www.jlts.stir.ac.uk/2011/05/cfp-paranoia-and-pain-conference/

Paranoia and Pain: Embodied in Psychology, Literature, and Bioscience (University of Liverpool, 2-4 April 2012) is an international cross-disciplinary conference, seeking to raise an awareness of various intersections of literature and science. The conference aims to explore overlapping paradigms of paranoia and pain in psychology, biological sciences, and literary texts/contexts. How is paranoia related to pain? How is pain expressed with/without paranoia? How are these two terms exposed in various contexts? How does our understanding of the psychophysiology of pain interrelate with literary accounts of paranoia and pain? What does research in the field of paranoia offer to literary studies surrounding this concept and vice versa? To what extent does pain echo paranoia; and is this echo physiological, stylistic, psychological, symbolic, or literal?How do these terms regulate our behaviour and expression of emotions in relation to broader concepts such as faith, ethics, and the value of human life? What does the study of these concepts offer today’s generation of intellectuals with regard to human relationships and the way we communicate with each other? This international conference brings together experts from different fields to address these questions by incorporating individual presentations and panels that focus on cross-disciplinary studies.

Considering the diversity of themes and questions for this conference, individual papers as well as pre-formed panels are invited to examine the following three key areas, proposed by the conference organizers. Other inter- and multi-disciplinary topics, relevant to the conference, will also be considered:

1- Impressions: Expression of paranoia and pain in literary/scientific contexts; Metaphorical and literal exposition of pain and paranoia; Paranoid texts, painful contexts; The image of paranoia and pain in poetry, prose, and visual arts; Textual culture and the symbolics of pain; Stylistics of pain and paranoia in communication; How does the narrative of pain/paranoia identify with studies of affect?

2- Intersections: The biology of pain and the emotional interpretation; The biology/literature of anaesthesia; Physical symptoms, emotional translations; Aesthetics and affective perspectives on pain/paranoia; How have cultural attitudes to the experience of pain and/or paranoia changed over the course of history?

3- Dissections: Faith and the formation of our ideas on pain/paranoia; Side effects of pain-relief medication; Ethics and the questions of double effect; Is it ever appropriate to withhold pain relief in order to extend the life of a sufferer where analgesics have the side effect of shortening life?

Submissions: Deadline for 250-300 word abstracts for 20-minute papers and a 50-100 word biography for individual presenters (including each presentation within potential panels): 15 November 2011. Deadline for full draft of accepted papers and registration: 25 February 2012

After the conference a selection of presentations, developed and edited, will be considered for publication. Please send submissions and enquiries to the organising board at paranoia.pain@gmail.com

CFP: Intl Conference, Pain, Suffering and Health

Call For Papers: International Conference on Pain, Suffering and Health, 27 April 2012, The University of Hong Kong

The Centre for the Humanities and Medicine at The University of Hong Kong invites the submission of abstracts from across the disciplines, in connection with the international conference Pain, Suffering and Health to be held on 27 April 2012 at The University of Hong Kong.

The conference is being organized by the Centre’s Philosophy, Therapy, Medicine research theme and seeks to develop comparative perspectives on the nature of pain and its significance in relation to suffering and health. A key focus of the meeting is on the extent to which experiences and understanding of pain, suffering and health differ across cultural and historical settings. A further aim of the conference is to consider the implication and applicability of theoretically-oriented approaches for health care professionals in clinical situations.

Possible topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The nature and evolution of pain
  • Culture and pain/Cultures of pain
  • Elaborations on pain (in both Chinese and Western Medicine, History, Philosophy, Literature, Music, Visual Art)
  • Pain and communication
  • Narratives of pain (particularly narratives of illnesses among health care professionals)
  • Pain and suffering
  • Religious perspectives on pain and suffering

Papers will be considered on any related theme.

Each presenter is limited to 20 minutes, with additional time for questions and discussion. To submit, please send via email a 300 word abstract by Friday 2nd December 2011 at the latest (response by 20th December 2011). Abstracts, which are sent in after this deadline, cannot be considered. Please include the following information: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract. E-mails should be entitled: Pain Abstract Submission.

All enquiries and abstracts should be directed to Dr. Barbara Dalle Pezze, leader of the Philosophy, Therapy, Medicine research theme at the Centre for the Humanities and Medicine (HKU): barbarad@hku.hk

More information on the centre: http://www.chm.hku.hk/index.html

CFP: Making Sense of Pain

3rd Global Conference Making Sense of: Pain, Saturday 19th May – Monday 21st May 2012, Prague, Czech Republic

Call for Papers: Pain and the body’s vulnerability to it are inevitable aspects of the experience of all sentient beings. Pain is universally feared. Many, if not all, fields of human activity have the potential to occasion pain – and much of what we do as individuals and/or collectivities involves our efforts to prevent, ameliorate, cure or avoid pain. Nonetheless, despite the unpleasantness and sometimes the agony of the experience of pain, we are also capable of enduring it. Depending on the context, we may do so willingly. Yet there is also the dark side of pain: humans are capable of inflicting it and at times do so intentionally, for gain or enjoyment; they can also injure and hurt other beings through carelessness and disregard of their needs and comfort.

This interdisciplinary conference provides a forum for inquiry into the vicissitudes of pain: its nature and existential significance, and the many ways in which pain plays a part in our lives. Of concern, too, are the biological, social and interpersonal circumstances within which our reactions to pain occur. The following themes are suggested as guides to the formulation of topics for papers and workshops:

  1. The Nature and Evolution of Pain
  2. Elaborations on Pain – in science, history, philosophy, literature and drama, art
  3. Inflicting pain – torture, sadism, self-harm, neglect and disregard
  4. Animals and pain – in nature and in culture
  5. Pain through the lifecycle– variations on the theme from birth to death
  6. Pain acceptance –martyrdom, childbirth, cosmetic surgery, work, performance (eg sport, music, dancing)
  7. Perspectives on pain – patients’ and professionals’
  8. Narratives of pain and palliation– managing, succeeding, failing to alleviate pain
  9. Practices, philosophies and dilemmas of pain relief– personal, professional, cultural, economic, political (macro and micro)
  10. Pain and Communication – expressing pain, understanding pain, describing pain, pain as metaphor, silences about pain

Papers will be considered on any related theme. The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. Papers will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th November 2011. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 9th March 2012. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords. E-mails should be entitled: PAIN Abstract Submission. Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year.

All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs: Nate Hinerman, Nursing/Theology and Religious Studies, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, USA E-mail: nphinerman@usfca.edu | Rob Fisher, Inter-Disciplinary.Net, Priory House, Wroslyn Road, Freeland, Oxfordshire OX29 8HR Email: pain3@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Making Sense Of: Hub series of ongoing research and publications projects conferences, run within the Probing the Boundaries domain which aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore innovative and challenging routes of intellectual and academic exploration. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume.

For further details of the project, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/pain/

For further details of the conference, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/making-sense-of/pain/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

CFP: Integrative Medicine After the Age of 40

Integrative Medicine After the Age of 40: The International Conference on Integrative Medicine, May 13-15, 2012, Jerusalem

The 2nd International Conference on Integrative Medicine will be held on May 13-15, 2012 in Jerusalem, Israel. The conference will bring together physicians, nurses and therapists from all over the world to discuss the changes and influence of the Integrative Medicine. The conference will be held in English, French and German with simultaneous translation. For details visit: http://www.mediconvention.com/

Main Topics:

  • Motor System, Movement and Posture study, Muscular Skeletal Pain, Myofascial Pain
  • Nutrition, Food Supplements, Digestive System, Metabolic Diseases
  • Wellness and Aging, Preventive Medicine
  • Neurological Disorders, Cognitive Disorder, Memory Disturbance
  • Depression, Stress, Sleep Disturbances, Insomnia – Non Organic Origin
  • The Oncologic Patient
  • Chronic Headache
  • Menopause
  • Cardiac Aspects, Hemodynamic System
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Mind and Body Medicine

The conference scientific committee encourages the submission of original Abstracts for either oral or poster presentations. All abstracts will be reviewed by the scientific committee. Abstract submission deadline abstracts may be submitted until Saturday, December 10th 2011. Details on submitting an abstract: http://www.mediconvention.com/abstract-submission