CFS: Narrative, Bioethics

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics: A Journal of Qualitative Research (NIB), published by Johns Hopkins University Press, provides a forum for exploring current issues in bioethics through the publication and analysis of personal stories, qualitative and mixed methods research articles, and case studies. Articles may address the experiences of patients and research participants, as well as health care workers and researchers. NIB seeks to publish articles that will appeal to a broad readership of health care providers and researchers, bioethicists, sociologists, policy makers, and others.

NIB invites 3 kinds of contributions:

  • Personal Stories. We seek true personal stories that will be included in “narrative symposia.” Each symposium will be on a specific topic, and will include 8 to 15 personal stories on the topic, followed by two commentary articles exploring themes in the stories to extract lessons or insights.
    • Our first three narrative symposia will be on the following topics:
      • Living with Conflicts of Interest in Medicine (Symposium Editor, James DuBois)
      • Nursing Assistants in Long-Term Care Facilities (Symposium Editor, Amy Haddad)
      • Experiences of Psychiatric Hospitalization (Symposium Editor, Charles Lidz)

Please visit our website http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/  for details on the narrative symposia, our guidelines for authors, and the kinds of stories we seek. For our first three issues, we will give priority to story proposals received by October 15, 2010; cases studies and research articles may be submitted at any time.

CFS: Stories/Disability (Narrative Inquiry Bioethics)

Call for Stories for a Narrative Symposium: Living with the Label “Disability” | Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics—A Journal of Qualitative Research | Edited by Jeffery Bishop, MD, PhD and Naomi Sunderland, PhD

http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/symposia.html

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish an issue focused on stories from people living with impairment-highlighting their encounters with both medical practice and research. The word “disability” suggests a coherent group with a set of common characteristics. Yet, there exists a broad spectrum of impairments experienced by the group of people with “disabilities.” Attention to such differences is important and diverse accounts may aide a more open and honest dialogue between stakeholders, policy makers, healthcare workers, and academics. We would like your true, personal stories in a form that is interesting and easy to read.

In writing your story, you might want to think about:

  • How does the label “disability” interact with other aspects of your life in health care settings, for example your gender, culture, and geographical location?
  • How does the term “disability” reflect your actual embodied experiences of impairment?
  • When does the label “disability” not do justice to your particular experience of impairment?
  • Have you accepted the label “disability” in your life? If yes, what effects has this had for you and others e.g. family, friends, health care providers, and co-workers?
  • Describe the kind of experiences you might have that are possible because of your impairment.
  • How have labels of disability affected the degree to which you feel that your “authentic voice” has been heard by others e.g. family, friends, health care providers?
  • How has the impact of the label disability changed for you over time e.g. as you have aged or as societal expectations and standards have changed?
  • How has the label “disability” been a hindrance in your life? Has the label been beneficial?
  • What else might you want people to know?

You do not need to address all of these questions-write on the issues that you think are most important to share with others. You do not need to be a writer, just tell your story in your own words. We plan to publish 12 stories (800 – 2000 words) on this topic. Additional stories may be published as online-only supplemental material. We also publish two to four commentary articles that discuss the stories in the journal. If we receive more stories than we can publish in the journal then the 1000 Voices group will invite those authors to share their stories on the 1000 Voices website.

If you are interested in submitting a story, we ask you first to submit a 300-word proposal-a short description of the story you want to tell. Please include a statement about 1) what type of impairment you are living with and 2) what country you live in. Inquiries or proposals should be sent to the editorial office via email: narrativebioethics@gmail.com 

Preference given to story proposals received by October 31, 2012. For more information about the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, the guidelines for authors, and privacy policies, visit our webpage with Johns Hopkins University Press at:

http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/guidelines.html

Every issue of Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will be available electronically to over 1,000 institutional subscribers via ProjectMUSE.

CFS: Moral Distress Stories (Narrative Inquiry Bioethics)

Call for Stories: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics — Narrative Symposium: The Many Faces of Moral Distress Among Clinicians

Edited by Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, F.A.A.N. and Renee Boss, MD, MHS

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish an issue devoted to personal stories from clinicians regarding situations that cause moral distress and how they have responded to them. Moral distress arises when professionals find that they are unable to act in accordance with their moral convictions. The focus of this inquiry is on the personal and professional short- and long-term impact of moral distress and the ways that clinicians respond to and make meaning from that distress. Appropriate contributors might include nurses, physicians, social workers, nursing assistants, clinical ethicists, occupational and physical therapists, and professionals in training. We want true, personal stories in a form that is easy to read.

In writing your story, you might want to think about:

  •  Which specific clinical situations give rise to moral distress? Why?
  •  How do you experience moral distress—physically, psychologically, socially or spiritually?
  •  How do you deal with moral distress? In past distressing situations …
    •  Did you take actions that allowed you to uphold your deepest values?
    •  What conditions within yourself, the people involved, and the external environment allowed you to do this?
    •  How did you made sense of the situation?
  •  What have been the short or long term consequences?
    •  Have you ever been professionally disciplined for acting upon your moral conviction?
    •  How has moral distress affected your job performance or your commitment to your job?
    •  What has been left undone or been the residual impact?
    •  How have your own values evolved as a result of moral distress?
  •  How would you change the system (e.g., policies, hierarchies, processes) to alleviate moral distress within your position? Do you think it can be alleviated, or is it inevitable?

You do not need to address all of these questions—write on the issues that you think are most important to share with others. You do not need to be a writer, just tell your story in your own words. We plan to publish 12 stories (800 – 2000 words) on this topic. Additional stories may be published as online-only supplemental material. We also publish two to four commentary articles that discuss the stories in the journal.

If you are interested in submitting a story, we ask you first to submit a 300-word proposal—a short description of the story you want to tell. Please include a statement about what type of clinician you are and what kind of environment you work in (no institutional names are needed). Inquiries or proposals should be sent to the editorial office via email: narrativebioethics@gmail.com  We will give preference to story proposals received by Oct 31st. For more information about the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, the guidelines for authors, and privacy policies, visit our webpage with Johns Hopkins University Press at: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/guidelines.html

CFS: Hektoen Int’l (Medical humanities)

Hektoen International, founded in Fall 2008, is a journal that explores the interdisciplinary field of the medical humanities. It is published online by the Hektoen Institute of Medicine, a not-for-profit organization promoting medical research and education. The journal is named in honor of Doctor Ludvig Hektoen, a distinguished professor of pathology at the University of Chicago. Hektoen International features articles on the medical humanities from a wide spectrum of global and cultural perspectives as they relate to health and healing. The journal also maintains an online art gallery and library for archiving artwork and articles. Hektoen International accepts for consideration articles that explore medicine and the healing arts through the lens of the humanities, exploring such disciplines as history, art, anthropology, ethics, literature, philosophy, religion, and sociology.

Submissions can include:

  • Scholarly articles written in engaging language for a general audience of the intellectually curious, with references to substantiate research
  • Essays sharing a personal perspective on general or controversial topics, presenting a balanced and thoughtful point of view
  • Personal narratives captivating for their visceral, first-hand experience
  • Short fiction that is engaging in style and thought-provoking in nature
  • Poetry, eloquent and thoughtful, appealing to the conscience and the intellect
  • Art, in any medium, that reflects a uniqueness of style and perspective and that can be either a process, outcome or both

We DO NOT accept research papers, clinical studies, or unsolicited book or film reviews.

Further information at: http://www.hektoeninternational.org/aboutus.html

CFS: Am J Kidney Diseases (personal narrative)

American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD) publishes a regular feature, “In a Few Words,” in which AJKD hopes to give voice to the personal experiences and stories that define kidney disease. They will accept for review nonfiction, narrative submissions up to 1,600 words, regarding the personal, ethical, or policy implications of any aspect of kidney disease in adults and children (acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, transplantation, ethics, health policy, genetics, etc). Footnotes or references are discouraged. Any submission which refers to real patients must be either unidentifiable or approved by the patient(s) described. Submissions from physicians, allied health professionals, patients, or family members are welcome. Items for consideration should be submitted via AJKD’s outline manuscript handling site: www.editorialmanager.com/ajkd  Questions or requests for assistance may be directed to the editorial office staff at: AJKD@tuftsmedicalcenter.org