You’re entitled: Article titles can improve article impact

Gwilym Lockwood, Neurobiology of Language Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands, has published a study of journal article titles and the impact effects of different styles.

As reported in Inside Higher Ed Lockwood has documented the efficacy of descriptive titles that go beyond announcing the topic but also declare the article’s findings.

Lockwood’s article, offering sensible advice while somewhat tongue in cheek, is available on line.

Your Research and Journalistic Media

While peer-reviewed scholarly journal publication is the goal of most researchers and scholars, you might also be attentive to the ways that you can bring your findings and work to a larger popular audience.

Journalists and other news media professionals are often interested in publicizing interesting research.

However, as John Oliver recently explained in his Last Week Tonight feature on scientific studies, the nuances of science are often lost on journalists (as well as their readers and viewers).

Inside Higher Ed editor Scott Jaschik offered some canny advice to researchers on how to work with journalists in his “Faculty and the Fourth Estate” (published by the AAUP in 2010).

What to do before a reporter calls (or before you call a reporter) is also the topic of a recent blog post on Tenure, She Wrote.

Inside Higher Ed: A Research Group of One’s Own

English novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf famously declared that a productive writing career required “a room of one’s own” and observed that historically women lacked such a room (as well as the uninterrupted time to use it).

Women academics may have the literal room but often lack room in their schedule because they tend to take on more service roles than men and spend less time on research, as reported in Inside Higher Ed.

However, women at Texas Tech and Indiana University are making room for research with faculty writing groups, which have been so productive that there has been a request for co-ed groups as well.

Details here: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/07/01/encouraging-female-faculty-publish-research

Midsummer Writing Advice

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, Ph.D., president of the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity and columnist for Inside Higher Ed, observes that we are at summer’s mid-point and advises those who have so far not made progress on their writing projects:

  1. Forgive yourself.
  2. Commit to a 14-day challenge.
  3. Pick one goal for those 14 days.
  4. Turn off all distractions and set a timer.
  5. Don’t go it alone.

Her essay is on line, open access: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2016/07/06/advice-how-get-yourself-out-writing-rut-essay

Poorly Written Spam from Predatory Journal

This spam solicitation in today’s email was so poorly written that I could not resist sharing it with readers of NursingWriting.com

Nxxx Pxxx and Cxxx journal asking you to send manuscript to publish under a single roof with Pxxx. You are free to gain the below features:

Express review process

Get processing confirmation (accept or reject by quality team) from Editorial Office within 24-48 hours when the time of submission

Review process within 3 weeks of time frame.

Article published instantly with Editor final acceptance.

Indexing
Cite Factor, Research Bib, SHERPA/ROMEO, ISI and more….

You can send an article by the reply to this email.

I strongly believe that I could have a submission from you within the deadline: July 15th 2016.

[Memo to Editor: I strongly believe that you could not have a submission from me . . . ever.]

 

 

Warning: Predatory Conference Organizers

If you thought it was difficult to assess whether or not a solicitation to submit a manuscript to an online open-access journal is legitimate, now comes the spawn of predatory journals: predatory conferences. To help us sort out the claims of conference participation solicitations, Jeffrey Beall’s ScholarlyOA web site provides a draft of criteria for identifying predatory conferences, written by James McCrostie, a full-time associate professor and part-time journalist in Japan who has written about such conferences.

https://scholarlyoa.com/2016/06/23/proposed-criteria-for-identifying-predatory-conferences/

Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know About Scholarly Publishing

Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf writing for the Scholarly Kitchen (“What’s hot and cooking in scholarly publishing”) explain the ecosystem, “scholarly hygiene,” business models, peer review, metrics, tools, and licenses and copyright.
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