Summer’s Here: Time to Get Writing!

Writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education‘s professional website Vitae, Joli Jensen, Hazel Rogers Professor of Communication at The University of Tulsa, reminds us “The semester is over! It’s time to write!” However, she also admonishes us to have a plan in order to get writing done:

  • Start with realistic scholarly and relaxation objectives.
  • Deploy basic productivity techniques.
  • Secure writing time, space and energy.
  • Keep a personal log and create an accountability system.
  • But cut yourself some slack.

When Reviewers Disagree (or at least contradict each other)

Karen Kelsky, writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Vitae explores the problem when two or more readers’ reports offer conflicting or contradictory suggestions for revision and resubmission. She advises: 1) You don’t have to accept every revision suggestion (though you need to address all of them); reviewers aren’t necessarily experts in your topic so you can disagree with them; and 3) letting go of ego, you can find revision suggestions helpful. The article is on line for subscribers: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/954-when-the-reviewers-disagree

CFP: A Paper Is More than Great Results (Grad Conf)

Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile is delighted to host the 2015 U21 Health Sciences Doctoral Forum which will focus on the theme: ‘A paper is more than great results’.

We would like to invite doctoral students in health sciences disciplines, who are advanced in their studies, to present their work at the forum. We are initially limiting student applications to one in each U21 institution; however, depending on demand, we will consider increasing the number of students in particular institutions.

Students’ presentations will be 10 minutes maximum, followed by 5 minutes for questions and 5 minutes for feedback from an international review panel. Students will not be expected to give an overview of their whole project but rather to highlight some of the issues they have encountered to get published and how they have resolved the issues. The main aim of this forum is to discuss the publication of manuscripts with a particular emphasis on the three following points:

  • Relevance of generating a manuscript
  • Challenges encountered to get published
  • How to choose a journal

Participating students will also have the opportunity to present a poster presenting their research that will be displayed in the coffee break and lunch area during the day of the forum.

Interested students should submit their abstract before 26 June 2015. An abstract submission form and a preliminary program for the event are available on the U21 HSG website.

Submissions of abstracts and any queries related to the 2015 Health Sciences Doctoral Forum should be directed to Dr Andrea Leiva.

Please circulate this communication to the relevant departments in your institutions and do not hesitate to let us know if you have any questions or comments.

CFS: Political Influence on Bioethical Deliberation (Narrative Inquiry Bioethics)

Call for Stories – Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics

Political Influence on Bioethical Deliberation

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics will publish a collection of personal stories from bioethicists who have felt political pressure to reach a specific conclusion in ethical deliberation. The deliberation could be as a clinical ethicist, a consultant to industry or law firms, a member of an expert panel, a faculty member, an ethics committee member, a community-engaged researcher, or other roles you play. Political pressure may come from any number of sources: Hospital administrators, contractors of consultation or expert witness services, government officials, academic administrators, committee members with political agendas, community partners, and others.

We want true, personal stories that describe the political dimension of work in bioethics. Please share this invitation and guide sheet with appropriate individuals.

In writing your story, please consider these questions:

           Who applied political pressure to your bioethical deliberations?

          What was their driving political concern? Did you share the political concern?

          How did you feel?

          How did you respond to the pressure? Did it affect your deliberations? Were you satisfied with the outcome?

          Did you feel you had access to processes or resources needed to protect your integrity?

          What advice would you have for others who are facing similar challenges in their work?

You do not need to address each of these questions—write on the issues that you think are most important to share with others. But please focus on sharing a personal story, rather than writing an essay or opinion piece.

If you are interested in submitting a story, we ask you first to submit a 300-word proposal—a short description of the story you want to tell. Inquiries or proposals should be sent to the editorial office via email: narrativebioethics@gmail.com. We will give preference to story proposals received by June 15, 2015.

We plan to publish 12 stories (4 – 10 double-spaced pages or 800 – 2000 words) on this topic. Some additional stories may be published as online-only supplemental material. We also publish 3 – 4 commentary articles that discuss the stories that are published in the journal. To see a finished symposium you may access Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics Volume 3.1 for free on Project MUSE.

For more information about the journal Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, the guidelines for authors, and privacy policies, visit our webpage at: http://www.nibjournal.org/authors/guidelines.html

CFS: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics

Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics: A Journal of Qualitative Research is a peer-reviewed journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press.  We seek manuscripts in the following two areas:

1.        Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research Articles. NIB welcomes submitted papers that report on qualitative and mixed methods research studies, including ethnographic, interview, focus group, observational, mixed methods, and related studies in the areas of bioethics, human research ethics, or health care ethics. A variety of approaches to inquiry are welcome, including narrative, phenomenological, grounded theory, ethnographic, and case study approaches.

2.        Case Studies. Case study articles are stand-alone articles that include an in-depth description and analysis of one or more instructive cases from health care that involve an ethical problem. NIB welcomes case studies on a variety of subjects including clinical care of patients, institutional undertakings, and policy initiatives. Case studies should be rich in description and should contain an analysis of the case that explores how the ethical challenges might best be addressed and what can be learned from the case.

Author Guidelines and further information about the Journal are available at:
http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/narrative_inquiry_in_bioethics/guidelines.html

Writing Academic Book Reviews

Although the journal article manuscript rather than the academic book is the coin of the realm in the academic nursing’s knowledge economy, nurses do write books and books are written for nurses, which means that readers need book reviews, typically in scholarly or professional journals. How do you secure the opportunity to write a book review? How does one structure a book review?

Casey Brienza explains it all to you: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/03/27/essay-writing-academic-book-reviews

Fail and Fail Often!

Writing for Inside Higher Ed, Kenneth Womack and Nichola D. Gutgold advise junior tenure track faculty:

The best advice we ever received when we were on the tenure track was that to be successful, we needed to keep sending our research out. We needed to work feverishly to develop an audience. In short, you have to be ready to respond quickly — or fail fast. Because what is failure? Is it merely a temporary result or a protracted state of mind? Consider the words of playwright Samuel Beckett: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Full essay here: https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/04/01/essay-importance-sharing-work-and-facing-rejection-advance-scholarly-career

 

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